Humiliation and the Inertia Effect: Implications for Understanding Violence and Compromise in Intractable Intergroup Conflicts

Humiliation and the Inertia Effect: Implications for Understanding Violence and Compromise in... © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156853708X358182 Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (2008) 281–294 www.brill.nl/jocc Humiliation and the Inertia Eff ect: Implications for Understanding Violence and Compromise in Intractable Intergroup Confl icts Jeremy Ginges a, * and Scott Atran b,c,d a Department of Psychology, New School for Social Research, 65 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003, USA b CNRS – Institut Jean Nicod, Paris, France c John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY, USA d University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA * Corresponding author, e-mail: gingesj@newschool.edu Abstract We investigated the infl uence of humiliation on inter-group confl ict in three studies of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza. We demonstrate that experienced humiliation produces an inertia eff ect ; a tendency towards inaction that suppresses rebellious or violent action but which paradoxically also suppresses support for acts of inter-group compromise. In Study 1, Palestinians who felt more humiliated by the Israeli occupation were less likely to support suicide attacks against Israelis. In Study 2, priming Palestinians with a humiliating experience caused fewer expressions of joy when subsequently hearing about suicide attacks. In Study 3, Palestinians who felt more humiliated by peace http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognition and Culture Brill

Humiliation and the Inertia Effect: Implications for Understanding Violence and Compromise in Intractable Intergroup Conflicts

Journal of Cognition and Culture, Volume 8 (3-4): 281 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1567-7095
eISSN
1568-5373
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853708X358182
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156853708X358182 Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (2008) 281–294 www.brill.nl/jocc Humiliation and the Inertia Eff ect: Implications for Understanding Violence and Compromise in Intractable Intergroup Confl icts Jeremy Ginges a, * and Scott Atran b,c,d a Department of Psychology, New School for Social Research, 65 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003, USA b CNRS – Institut Jean Nicod, Paris, France c John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY, USA d University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA * Corresponding author, e-mail: gingesj@newschool.edu Abstract We investigated the infl uence of humiliation on inter-group confl ict in three studies of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza. We demonstrate that experienced humiliation produces an inertia eff ect ; a tendency towards inaction that suppresses rebellious or violent action but which paradoxically also suppresses support for acts of inter-group compromise. In Study 1, Palestinians who felt more humiliated by the Israeli occupation were less likely to support suicide attacks against Israelis. In Study 2, priming Palestinians with a humiliating experience caused fewer expressions of joy when subsequently hearing about suicide attacks. In Study 3, Palestinians who felt more humiliated by peace

Journal

Journal of Cognition and CultureBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: TERRORISM; VIOLENCE; CONFLICT; HUMILIATION; POLITICAL

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