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Human Rights and Counterterrorism in Global Governance: Reputation and Resistance

Human Rights and Counterterrorism in Global Governance: Reputation and Resistance Global Governance 11 (2005), 291–310 Human Rights and Counterterrorism in Global Governance: Reputation and Resistance Rosemary Foot Focusing on U.S. and Asian state behavior, and UN and Asia-Pacific organizations, I explore the argument that a reputation for effective- ness in the counterterrorist campaign has become more significant than a reputation for defending human rights. I conclude that only where human rights issues had established a reasonably firm domestic and international institutional foothold before September 11, 2001, does a reputation built on concern for the protection of human rights retain an ability to constrain certain of the illiberal trends associated with the counterterrorist agenda. Nevertheless, even in these instances, counterterrorist requirements are shaping institutional behavior and rhetoric and depleting the resources available for dealing with human EYWORDS: reputation in world politics, attack on per- rights abuse. K sonal security rights, institutional activism post–September 11. he terrorist assault on U.S. territory in September 2001 has been instrumental in modifying or redefining certain of the social prac- tices that have guided interactions in world politics among a range of state and nonstate bodies. This is particularly the case in the area of human rights, or more precisely with respect to the right http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Human Rights and Counterterrorism in Global Governance: Reputation and Resistance

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01103003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 11 (2005), 291–310 Human Rights and Counterterrorism in Global Governance: Reputation and Resistance Rosemary Foot Focusing on U.S. and Asian state behavior, and UN and Asia-Pacific organizations, I explore the argument that a reputation for effective- ness in the counterterrorist campaign has become more significant than a reputation for defending human rights. I conclude that only where human rights issues had established a reasonably firm domestic and international institutional foothold before September 11, 2001, does a reputation built on concern for the protection of human rights retain an ability to constrain certain of the illiberal trends associated with the counterterrorist agenda. Nevertheless, even in these instances, counterterrorist requirements are shaping institutional behavior and rhetoric and depleting the resources available for dealing with human EYWORDS: reputation in world politics, attack on per- rights abuse. K sonal security rights, institutional activism post–September 11. he terrorist assault on U.S. territory in September 2001 has been instrumental in modifying or redefining certain of the social prac- tices that have guided interactions in world politics among a range of state and nonstate bodies. This is particularly the case in the area of human rights, or more precisely with respect to the right

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2005

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