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How to Manage Interorganizational Disputes over Mediation in Africa

How to Manage Interorganizational Disputes over Mediation in Africa Global Governance 23 (2017), 151–162 GLOBAL FORUM How to Manage Interorganizational Disputes over Mediation in Africa Laurie Nathan AMONG THE MOST TROUBLING ASPECTS OF CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL mediation are the tensions and competition that arise between multilateral organizations with overlapping mandates for peacemaking. This problem has been severe in Africa, where mediation has periodically been wracked by intense disputes among the United Nations, the African Union (AU), and the subregional bodies known as regional economic communities (RECs). As discussed in this essay, the high-profile cases include Zimbabwe (2008), Madagascar (2009), Côte d’Ivoire (2011), Darfur (2011), Libya (2011), Guinea-Bissau (2012), Mali (2012), Central African Republic (2013 and 2015), and Burkina Faso (2015). The interorganizational disputes have an extremely negative impact on peacemaking. While they do not occur in every conflict on the continent, they have arisen often enough and are sufficiently serious for the UN, the AU, and the RECs to have embarked on initiatives to prevent their recur- rence. The Africans believe that the solution lies in the principle of sub- sidiarity in peacemaking, according to which the response to conflicts should be led at the regional rather than the global level. Support for peacemaking subsidiarity can be found in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

How to Manage Interorganizational Disputes over Mediation in Africa

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02302002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 23 (2017), 151–162 GLOBAL FORUM How to Manage Interorganizational Disputes over Mediation in Africa Laurie Nathan AMONG THE MOST TROUBLING ASPECTS OF CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL mediation are the tensions and competition that arise between multilateral organizations with overlapping mandates for peacemaking. This problem has been severe in Africa, where mediation has periodically been wracked by intense disputes among the United Nations, the African Union (AU), and the subregional bodies known as regional economic communities (RECs). As discussed in this essay, the high-profile cases include Zimbabwe (2008), Madagascar (2009), Côte d’Ivoire (2011), Darfur (2011), Libya (2011), Guinea-Bissau (2012), Mali (2012), Central African Republic (2013 and 2015), and Burkina Faso (2015). The interorganizational disputes have an extremely negative impact on peacemaking. While they do not occur in every conflict on the continent, they have arisen often enough and are sufficiently serious for the UN, the AU, and the RECs to have embarked on initiatives to prevent their recur- rence. The Africans believe that the solution lies in the principle of sub- sidiarity in peacemaking, according to which the response to conflicts should be led at the regional rather than the global level. Support for peacemaking subsidiarity can be found in

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2017

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