How small is a small drop of water?

How small is a small drop of water? 121 time, the authors provisionally kept this as a separate species, distinguished by lower lip region, slightly shorter odontostyle, smaller prerectum/ABW ratio and some details of tail shape. Comparison of holotype and paratypes of T. macrurz?.r with type specimens of T. leptonchoidcJ showed that the lip region is of similar shape (Fig. 1, A and C). The holotype of T. macrurus has odontostyle length = 6 wm, a value found also among specimens of T. lepioncboides. Odontostyle lumen in T. macrurus appears to be narrower than in T. leptonc-boides, but the difference is very small and insufficient for specific differentation. The shape of the tail is identical; the tail is slightly contracted dorsally in the middle and in its distal half the inner tissues are contracted and lie closer to the ventral body wall. The cuticle possesses a thin, well-marked outer layer, the surface of which shows fine transverse striae on the distal part of the tail (Fig. 1, B and D-G). In 13 speci- mens of T. leptonchoide.r (holotype, para- and topotypes) body width ranges from 20-29 Am, ABW from 14-19 Am, rectum length from 11-16 ¡tm, prerectum length from 40-65 PR/R from 3.1-4.6 and PR/BW from 1.8-2.7. The holotype of T. macrurUJ has BW 23 Am, ABW 15 um, R 13 ¡till, PR 60 p.m, PR/R 4.6 and PR/BW 2.6. Thus the holotype of T'. rnacrurzi.r falls well within the range of variation of T. lepionchoides. We agree that T. macrurus is identical with T. leptonchoide.r. The latter name, having 13 days' priority of publication (October 15 versus October 28), is the valid name. JAIRAJPURI, M. S. (1965). Three new species of the genus Tylencholaimus de Man, 1876 (Nema- toda : Dorylaimoidea) from India. Nematologica 10, 512-518. LOOF, P. A. A. (1964). Free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes from Venezuela. Ibid. 10, 201-300. LOOF, P. A. A. & JAIRAJPURI, M. S. (1968). Taxonomic studies on the genus Tylencholaimus de Man, 1876 (Dorylaimoidea) with a key to the species. Ibid. 14, 317-350. SIDDIQI, M. R. (1964). Tylencholaimus macrurus n. sp. (Nematoda: Dorylaimidea) from jungle soil in Karwi (U.P.), India. Labdev J. Sci. Technol. 2, 266. SHORT COMMUNICATIONS J. W. SEINHORST 1) : How small is a small drop of water? In the description of the method for killing nematodes with hot f.a 4 : 1 Seinhorst (1962) mentions that the nematodes to be killed should be placed in a small drop of water. From discussions with several collegues using this method and the quality of their fixed specimens I derive that what they consider a small drop may be considerably larger than the size meant by Seinhorst (1962). The diameter of the drop should not be much larger than the length of the nematodes to be killed when the nematodes are less than a millimeter long and should be less than nematode length with larger nematodes. When a considerable number of specimens (10 to 40) are to be killed simul- taneously the drop should be just large enough to contain them all and prevent them from moving out of the drop. A good method for placing the nematodes in such a small drop is to place them in a larger one on a siliconized glass dish first, move them to one side of this drop with a sharpened pig's hair and then push them out of the drop over the glass surface as many at a time as possible. Mostly just enough water will go along with the nematodes to have them in a drop of the required size, but if necessary small quantities of water can be moved from the larger drop to the one containing the nematodes. Killing nematodes in very small drops of water clearly gives better results than killing in larger ones. The reason probably is that the quality of fixation depends on the time that elapses between the death of the issue by the heat transmitted to it from the hot fixative through the water of the drop containing the nematodes and the penetration of the fixative into this tissues. The smaller the drop of water the shorter this time. SEINHORST, J. W. (1962). On the killing, fixing and transferring to glycerin of nematodes. Nema. tologica 8, 29-32. 1) Instituut voor Plantenziektenkundig Onderzoek, Wageningen, The Netherlands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nematologica Brill

How small is a small drop of water?

Nematologica, Volume 19 (1): 121 – Jan 1, 1973
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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1973 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0028-2596
eISSN
1875-2926
D.O.I.
10.1163/187529273X00231
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Abstract

121 time, the authors provisionally kept this as a separate species, distinguished by lower lip region, slightly shorter odontostyle, smaller prerectum/ABW ratio and some details of tail shape. Comparison of holotype and paratypes of T. macrurz?.r with type specimens of T. leptonchoidcJ showed that the lip region is of similar shape (Fig. 1, A and C). The holotype of T. macrurus has odontostyle length = 6 wm, a value found also among specimens of T. lepioncboides. Odontostyle lumen in T. macrurus appears to be narrower than in T. leptonc-boides, but the difference is very small and insufficient for specific differentation. The shape of the tail is identical; the tail is slightly contracted dorsally in the middle and in its distal half the inner tissues are contracted and lie closer to the ventral body wall. The cuticle possesses a thin, well-marked outer layer, the surface of which shows fine transverse striae on the distal part of the tail (Fig. 1, B and D-G). In 13 speci- mens of T. leptonchoide.r (holotype, para- and topotypes) body width ranges from 20-29 Am, ABW from 14-19 Am, rectum length from 11-16 ¡tm, prerectum length from 40-65 PR/R from 3.1-4.6 and PR/BW from 1.8-2.7. The holotype of T. macrurUJ has BW 23 Am, ABW 15 um, R 13 ¡till, PR 60 p.m, PR/R 4.6 and PR/BW 2.6. Thus the holotype of T'. rnacrurzi.r falls well within the range of variation of T. lepionchoides. We agree that T. macrurus is identical with T. leptonchoide.r. The latter name, having 13 days' priority of publication (October 15 versus October 28), is the valid name. JAIRAJPURI, M. S. (1965). Three new species of the genus Tylencholaimus de Man, 1876 (Nema- toda : Dorylaimoidea) from India. Nematologica 10, 512-518. LOOF, P. A. A. (1964). Free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes from Venezuela. Ibid. 10, 201-300. LOOF, P. A. A. & JAIRAJPURI, M. S. (1968). Taxonomic studies on the genus Tylencholaimus de Man, 1876 (Dorylaimoidea) with a key to the species. Ibid. 14, 317-350. SIDDIQI, M. R. (1964). Tylencholaimus macrurus n. sp. (Nematoda: Dorylaimidea) from jungle soil in Karwi (U.P.), India. Labdev J. Sci. Technol. 2, 266. SHORT COMMUNICATIONS J. W. SEINHORST 1) : How small is a small drop of water? In the description of the method for killing nematodes with hot f.a 4 : 1 Seinhorst (1962) mentions that the nematodes to be killed should be placed in a small drop of water. From discussions with several collegues using this method and the quality of their fixed specimens I derive that what they consider a small drop may be considerably larger than the size meant by Seinhorst (1962). The diameter of the drop should not be much larger than the length of the nematodes to be killed when the nematodes are less than a millimeter long and should be less than nematode length with larger nematodes. When a considerable number of specimens (10 to 40) are to be killed simul- taneously the drop should be just large enough to contain them all and prevent them from moving out of the drop. A good method for placing the nematodes in such a small drop is to place them in a larger one on a siliconized glass dish first, move them to one side of this drop with a sharpened pig's hair and then push them out of the drop over the glass surface as many at a time as possible. Mostly just enough water will go along with the nematodes to have them in a drop of the required size, but if necessary small quantities of water can be moved from the larger drop to the one containing the nematodes. Killing nematodes in very small drops of water clearly gives better results than killing in larger ones. The reason probably is that the quality of fixation depends on the time that elapses between the death of the issue by the heat transmitted to it from the hot fixative through the water of the drop containing the nematodes and the penetration of the fixative into this tissues. The smaller the drop of water the shorter this time. SEINHORST, J. W. (1962). On the killing, fixing and transferring to glycerin of nematodes. Nema. tologica 8, 29-32. 1) Instituut voor Plantenziektenkundig Onderzoek, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Journal

NematologicaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1973

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