How Chinese are Chinese Christians Today?

How Chinese are Chinese Christians Today? In recent years, some scholars in China have called for Chinese Christians to zhongguohua 中国化 (become more Chinese), a process that might be expressed in English by less-common words like “sinicization” or “sinofication.” Indeed, zhongguohua has become part of the party-state’s religious policy and is actively reinforced through new regulations. Even though the presence of Christianity in China can be traced back to the seventh century ce or even earlier, many people, including scholars, continue to depict Christianity in China as a foreign or nontraditional religion. When people use the term “foreign religion” (yangjiao 洋教) to describe Christianity, it is usually coupled with an ideology-driven discourse demanding more zhongguohua. The notion that Christianity is a “nontraditional religion” (fei chuantong zongjiao 非传统宗教), on the other hand, has some validity. First, Christians remain a numerical minority in Chinese societies and in most of the diasporic communities. Second, many Chinese Christians are first-generation converts or children of these converts. Therefore, it is reasonable to ask: How Chinese are Chinese Christians today? This question is actually susceptible to two very different interpretations. First, to what degree are Chinese Christians Chinese? Second, in what ways are they Chinese?The articles in this issue can be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Religion and Chinese Society Brill

How Chinese are Chinese Christians Today?

Review of Religion and Chinese Society, Volume 4 (1): 3 – Apr 27, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/how-chinese-are-chinese-christians-today-3lp4Ucwnyy
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2214-3947
eISSN
2214-3955
DOI
10.1163/22143955-00401001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In recent years, some scholars in China have called for Chinese Christians to zhongguohua 中国化 (become more Chinese), a process that might be expressed in English by less-common words like “sinicization” or “sinofication.” Indeed, zhongguohua has become part of the party-state’s religious policy and is actively reinforced through new regulations. Even though the presence of Christianity in China can be traced back to the seventh century ce or even earlier, many people, including scholars, continue to depict Christianity in China as a foreign or nontraditional religion. When people use the term “foreign religion” (yangjiao 洋教) to describe Christianity, it is usually coupled with an ideology-driven discourse demanding more zhongguohua. The notion that Christianity is a “nontraditional religion” (fei chuantong zongjiao 非传统宗教), on the other hand, has some validity. First, Christians remain a numerical minority in Chinese societies and in most of the diasporic communities. Second, many Chinese Christians are first-generation converts or children of these converts. Therefore, it is reasonable to ask: How Chinese are Chinese Christians today? This question is actually susceptible to two very different interpretations. First, to what degree are Chinese Christians Chinese? Second, in what ways are they Chinese?The articles in this issue can be

Journal

Review of Religion and Chinese SocietyBrill

Published: Apr 27, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off