Homage to Fracastoro in A Germano-Flemish Composition of About 1590?

Homage to Fracastoro in A Germano-Flemish Composition of About 1590? ERWIN PANOFSKY It is unusual, probably unique, for a new disease to receive its name neither from its pathognomical characteristics ("Poliomyelitis"), nor from its discoverer ("Parkinson's Disease"), nor from its place of origin ("Texas Fever"), nor from a saint supposed to specialize in curing it ("St. Anthony's Fire"), but from an imaginary character invented by a poet. Such, however, is the case with syphilis. In referring to this disease as a "new" one, I have given credence to the documents thus far available even though the diagnostic validity of these documents is not unanimously accepted. From ca. 1495, European literature resounds with terrified complaints about an ailment previously unknown. In one of the earliest, if not the earliest, recorded accounts - a letter sent by one Nicola Sallazio to one Ambrogio Rosati and dated Barcelona, June 18, 1495 - this ailment is called a "morbus qui nuper e Gallia defluxit in alias nationes"I. In one of the earliest, if not the earliest, circumstantial descriptions circulated in print, a broadsheet issued on August I, 1496 by a Nuremberg physician, Theodorus Ulsenius ( I), it is referred to as a "nuper inaudita scabies" or "ignota pestis" which no one can http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online Brill

Homage to Fracastoro in A Germano-Flemish Composition of About 1590?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/homage-to-fracastoro-in-a-germano-flemish-composition-of-about-1590-SaqAOl73lI
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
Copyright 1961 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-6726
eISSN
2214-5966
D.O.I.
10.1163/22145966-90000335
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ERWIN PANOFSKY It is unusual, probably unique, for a new disease to receive its name neither from its pathognomical characteristics ("Poliomyelitis"), nor from its discoverer ("Parkinson's Disease"), nor from its place of origin ("Texas Fever"), nor from a saint supposed to specialize in curing it ("St. Anthony's Fire"), but from an imaginary character invented by a poet. Such, however, is the case with syphilis. In referring to this disease as a "new" one, I have given credence to the documents thus far available even though the diagnostic validity of these documents is not unanimously accepted. From ca. 1495, European literature resounds with terrified complaints about an ailment previously unknown. In one of the earliest, if not the earliest, recorded accounts - a letter sent by one Nicola Sallazio to one Ambrogio Rosati and dated Barcelona, June 18, 1495 - this ailment is called a "morbus qui nuper e Gallia defluxit in alias nationes"I. In one of the earliest, if not the earliest, circumstantial descriptions circulated in print, a broadsheet issued on August I, 1496 by a Nuremberg physician, Theodorus Ulsenius ( I), it is referred to as a "nuper inaudita scabies" or "ignota pestis" which no one can

Journal

Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1961

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off