Hobbes'forgotten Natural Histories

Hobbes'forgotten Natural Histories Hobbes'forgotten Natural Histories ROBIN BUNCE Abstract: Thomas Hobbes' natural philosophy is often characterised as rationalistic in opposition to the emerging inductivist method employed by Francis Bacon and fellows of the Gresham College - later the Royal Society. Where as the inductivists researched and published a multitude of natural histories, Hobbes' mature publica- tions contain little natural historical information. Nonetheless, Hobbes read numerous natural histories and incorporated them into his works and often used details from these histories to support important theoretical moves. He also wrote a number of natural histories, some of which remain either unpublished or untranslated. Hobbes' own mature statements about his early interest in natural histories are also mislead- ing. This article attempts to review Hobbes' early writings on natural histories and argues that his works of the 1630s and 1640s owe a significant debt to the natural histories of Francis Bacon, Hobbes' one-time patron. Hobbes' suspicion of natural histories in the 1650s, 1660s and 1670s is well known. However, the roots and development of his view are rarely discussed. Hobbes claimed that his mature attitude to natural histories was shaped in the 1630s. Towards the end of his life he wrote: B: Julius Scaliger http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hobbes Studies Brill

Hobbes'forgotten Natural Histories

Hobbes Studies, Volume 19 (1): 77 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0921-5891
eISSN
1875-0257
D.O.I.
10.1163/187502506X00051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hobbes'forgotten Natural Histories ROBIN BUNCE Abstract: Thomas Hobbes' natural philosophy is often characterised as rationalistic in opposition to the emerging inductivist method employed by Francis Bacon and fellows of the Gresham College - later the Royal Society. Where as the inductivists researched and published a multitude of natural histories, Hobbes' mature publica- tions contain little natural historical information. Nonetheless, Hobbes read numerous natural histories and incorporated them into his works and often used details from these histories to support important theoretical moves. He also wrote a number of natural histories, some of which remain either unpublished or untranslated. Hobbes' own mature statements about his early interest in natural histories are also mislead- ing. This article attempts to review Hobbes' early writings on natural histories and argues that his works of the 1630s and 1640s owe a significant debt to the natural histories of Francis Bacon, Hobbes' one-time patron. Hobbes' suspicion of natural histories in the 1650s, 1660s and 1670s is well known. However, the roots and development of his view are rarely discussed. Hobbes claimed that his mature attitude to natural histories was shaped in the 1630s. Towards the end of his life he wrote: B: Julius Scaliger

Journal

Hobbes StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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