Helsinki-II and the Second Basket

Helsinki-II and the Second Basket Helsinki-II and the Second Basket Rob Zaagman1 Part 1 - The Second Basket: Second Class? Introduction The Second Basket (cooperation within the CSCE in the fields of economics, the environment, science and technology) has always enjoyed what were at best mixed feelings from the participating States of the CSCE. From the beginning of the Helsinki process, the communist countries had stressed the importance of incorporating economic cooperation in the CSCE. They hoped to secure access to Western markets, in the first place by acquiring Most Favoured Nation status. More importantly, they needed Western credits and technological know-how in order to modernise their economies. The CSCE might prove to be a way of neutralising cocoM, the institution of the Western states which had (and still has) as its task to prevent the sale and export of 'strategic' Western technology to the 'wrong' countries, in the first place communist countries. Apart from the fact that these two East-bloc desiderata did not run parallel to Western interests, the Western states stood to gain much less from the Second Basket and consequently were much less concerned with achieving progress in this area of cooperation. If they could acquire statistical information and achieve http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Helsinki Monitor (in 2008 continued as Security and Human Rights) Brill

Helsinki-II and the Second Basket

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0925-0972
eISSN
1571-814X
D.O.I.
10.1163/157181492X00282
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Helsinki-II and the Second Basket Rob Zaagman1 Part 1 - The Second Basket: Second Class? Introduction The Second Basket (cooperation within the CSCE in the fields of economics, the environment, science and technology) has always enjoyed what were at best mixed feelings from the participating States of the CSCE. From the beginning of the Helsinki process, the communist countries had stressed the importance of incorporating economic cooperation in the CSCE. They hoped to secure access to Western markets, in the first place by acquiring Most Favoured Nation status. More importantly, they needed Western credits and technological know-how in order to modernise their economies. The CSCE might prove to be a way of neutralising cocoM, the institution of the Western states which had (and still has) as its task to prevent the sale and export of 'strategic' Western technology to the 'wrong' countries, in the first place communist countries. Apart from the fact that these two East-bloc desiderata did not run parallel to Western interests, the Western states stood to gain much less from the Second Basket and consequently were much less concerned with achieving progress in this area of cooperation. If they could acquire statistical information and achieve

Journal

Helsinki Monitor (in 2008 continued as Security and Human Rights)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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