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Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy

Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy * Book Notes discuss books on ancient philosophy that are sent to the journal for review. F. Verde, Elachista . 1 This substantial monograph, based on a Rome PhD thesis, is the first devoted wholly to the Epicurean doctrine of minimal parts. The three chapters offer (1) an analysis of the primary sources for the doctrine in Epicurus and Lucretius, (2) a reconstruction of the likely philosophical background for its formulation, and (3) a detailed study of the largely geometrical development of the theory within the Epicurean school. Verde has distinctive claims to make on all these topics. In the first chapter, the focus is both on underlining the conceptual importance of the doctrine, which Verde thinks has been understated by some recent discussions, and on placing it firmly in the expository framework of the relevant discussions by Epicurus and Lucretius. The second chapter argues for the importance of understanding the theory as a response to analogous ideas in Xenocrates, Aristotle and Diodorus Cronus. In the third chapter, Verde suggests that, in later Epicurean thinking, the idea of minimal parts formed a key part of the project of providing a form of geometry that was used to support http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Phronesis Brill

Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy

Phronesis , Volume 60 (2): 253 – Mar 2, 2015

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Notes
ISSN
0031-8868
eISSN
1568-5284
DOI
10.1163/15685284-12341285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

* Book Notes discuss books on ancient philosophy that are sent to the journal for review. F. Verde, Elachista . 1 This substantial monograph, based on a Rome PhD thesis, is the first devoted wholly to the Epicurean doctrine of minimal parts. The three chapters offer (1) an analysis of the primary sources for the doctrine in Epicurus and Lucretius, (2) a reconstruction of the likely philosophical background for its formulation, and (3) a detailed study of the largely geometrical development of the theory within the Epicurean school. Verde has distinctive claims to make on all these topics. In the first chapter, the focus is both on underlining the conceptual importance of the doctrine, which Verde thinks has been understated by some recent discussions, and on placing it firmly in the expository framework of the relevant discussions by Epicurus and Lucretius. The second chapter argues for the importance of understanding the theory as a response to analogous ideas in Xenocrates, Aristotle and Diodorus Cronus. In the third chapter, Verde suggests that, in later Epicurean thinking, the idea of minimal parts formed a key part of the project of providing a form of geometry that was used to support

Journal

PhronesisBrill

Published: Mar 2, 2015

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