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Heidegger and the Question of Ethics

Heidegger and the Question of Ethics 23 Heidegger and the Question of Ethics CHARLES E. SCOTT Vanderbilt Uniaersity ioog, VOJ.1Óç, VOJ.1Óç, AND THE QUESTION OF ETHICS The word £0Ea in Homer was used to name the places where animals belong. The animal's t80ç is the place to which it returns, the place that is its habitat, its dwelling place. If the animal cannot return to its ioog, a violation of its particular order occurs, as when a wild horse is hobbled in a stall and cannot return to its own environment. In the Iliad (6.506-11) Homer says, "As when a stabled horse, having been fed at a manger, breaks his bonds and runs galloping over the plain, since he is accustomed to bath in the flowing river, glorying. He holds his head high, and his mane leaps on his shoulders on both sides. His knees swiftly bear him, trusting his splendor, through the É8Ea and pastures (vop6g) of horses."' In the Odyssey, Homer speaks of £0Ea to which pigs, specifically sows, return after grazing. In both uses of ioea one finds the connotation of appropriateness for particular animals. In the instance of the horse running free back to his t8Ea and voR6g, he has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Heidegger and the Question of Ethics

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 18 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 1988

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1988 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916488X00020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

23 Heidegger and the Question of Ethics CHARLES E. SCOTT Vanderbilt Uniaersity ioog, VOJ.1Óç, VOJ.1Óç, AND THE QUESTION OF ETHICS The word £0Ea in Homer was used to name the places where animals belong. The animal's t80ç is the place to which it returns, the place that is its habitat, its dwelling place. If the animal cannot return to its ioog, a violation of its particular order occurs, as when a wild horse is hobbled in a stall and cannot return to its own environment. In the Iliad (6.506-11) Homer says, "As when a stabled horse, having been fed at a manger, breaks his bonds and runs galloping over the plain, since he is accustomed to bath in the flowing river, glorying. He holds his head high, and his mane leaps on his shoulders on both sides. His knees swiftly bear him, trusting his splendor, through the É8Ea and pastures (vop6g) of horses."' In the Odyssey, Homer speaks of £0Ea to which pigs, specifically sows, return after grazing. In both uses of ioea one finds the connotation of appropriateness for particular animals. In the instance of the horse running free back to his t8Ea and voR6g, he has

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1988

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