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Heidegger and the New Images of Science

Heidegger and the New Images of Science 162 Heidegger and the New Images of Science THEODORE KISIEL Northern Illinois University Heidegger and science? To some, the combination undoubtedly still sounds strange and unlikely, let alone fruitful and worthy of extended consideration. What could we possibly expect to learn about the inner workings of science from a thinker singularly and almost monotonously concerned with the time-honored and now grandiose question of Being? In the words of one astute commentator: "On the longest day he ever lived, Heidegger could never be called a philosopher of science."' And yet, those intimately acquainted with Heidegger's entire career can easily point to just such a day, and it must have been a long day indeed. For on July 27, 1915, the young Dr. Heidegger (age 25) held his inaugural lecture before the philosophical faculty at the University of Freiburg in order to obtain his venia legendi, the privilege to teach in the German university system, conceiving the lecture precisely as a logical- epistemological examination of the concept of time in natural science and in historical science.2 2 'William J. Richardson, "Heidegger's Critique of Science," New Scholasticism XLII (1968) 511-536. But this opening sentence of the article is moderated by a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Heidegger and the New Images of Science

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 7 (1): 162 – Jan 1, 1977

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1977 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916477X00112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

162 Heidegger and the New Images of Science THEODORE KISIEL Northern Illinois University Heidegger and science? To some, the combination undoubtedly still sounds strange and unlikely, let alone fruitful and worthy of extended consideration. What could we possibly expect to learn about the inner workings of science from a thinker singularly and almost monotonously concerned with the time-honored and now grandiose question of Being? In the words of one astute commentator: "On the longest day he ever lived, Heidegger could never be called a philosopher of science."' And yet, those intimately acquainted with Heidegger's entire career can easily point to just such a day, and it must have been a long day indeed. For on July 27, 1915, the young Dr. Heidegger (age 25) held his inaugural lecture before the philosophical faculty at the University of Freiburg in order to obtain his venia legendi, the privilege to teach in the German university system, conceiving the lecture precisely as a logical- epistemological examination of the concept of time in natural science and in historical science.2 2 'William J. Richardson, "Heidegger's Critique of Science," New Scholasticism XLII (1968) 511-536. But this opening sentence of the article is moderated by a

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1977

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