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Hegel, Heidegger, and the Question of Art Today

Hegel, Heidegger, and the Question of Art Today 112 Hegel, Heidegger, and the Question of Art Today ANDREAS GROSSMANN So I think, Hippias, that I have benefited by conversation with both of you; for I think I know the meaning of the proverb: "beautiful things are difficult." - Plato, Hippias Major, 304e The discussion concerning the stature of art in the work of Hegel and Heidegger has recently been renewed by Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann and Joseph Kockelmans.' Both authors maintain that Heidegger's essay On the Origin of the Work of Art gives an outline of a philosophy of art or even itself constitutes Heidegger's philosophy of art. Moreover, Kockelmans explicitly claims that Heidegger's essay tries to retrieve Hegel's lectures on aesthetics. The following paper shall examine the plausibility of these views. As a first step (I), I sketch the development of Hegel's thinking from the Oldest System Programme of German Idealism to his Aesthetics with reference to Hegel's own experience of art and to the socio-political context of his time. The second part (II) then deals with Heidegger's reflections on art, poetry, and lan- guage, beginning with his interpretations of Hi5lderlin's hymns. I shall focus upon the extent to which Heidegger takes up again the conception http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Hegel, Heidegger, and the Question of Art Today

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 20 (1): 112 – Jan 1, 1990

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1990 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916490X00072
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

112 Hegel, Heidegger, and the Question of Art Today ANDREAS GROSSMANN So I think, Hippias, that I have benefited by conversation with both of you; for I think I know the meaning of the proverb: "beautiful things are difficult." - Plato, Hippias Major, 304e The discussion concerning the stature of art in the work of Hegel and Heidegger has recently been renewed by Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann and Joseph Kockelmans.' Both authors maintain that Heidegger's essay On the Origin of the Work of Art gives an outline of a philosophy of art or even itself constitutes Heidegger's philosophy of art. Moreover, Kockelmans explicitly claims that Heidegger's essay tries to retrieve Hegel's lectures on aesthetics. The following paper shall examine the plausibility of these views. As a first step (I), I sketch the development of Hegel's thinking from the Oldest System Programme of German Idealism to his Aesthetics with reference to Hegel's own experience of art and to the socio-political context of his time. The second part (II) then deals with Heidegger's reflections on art, poetry, and lan- guage, beginning with his interpretations of Hi5lderlin's hymns. I shall focus upon the extent to which Heidegger takes up again the conception

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1990

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