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Gurwitsch's Phenomenological Theory of Natural Science

Gurwitsch's Phenomenological Theory of Natural Science 29 Gurwitsch's Phenomenological Theory of Natural Science JOSEPH J. KOCKELMANS o On another occasion I made the remark that in my view Aron Gurwitsch has made substantial constributions to contemporary philos- ophy in at least four different realms, namely transcendental phenomenol- ogy, psychology, philosophy of science, and the history of philosophy. I I continue to maintain this view. Since other speakers have already focussed on three of these themes, I shall limit myself to making several observa- , tions on his philosophy of science. Gurwitsch's interest in and knowledge of the philosophy of science is to some extent known only to his closer friends. It is obviously true that everyone present here knows about Gurwitsch's publications on the philos- ophy of the social sciences and particularly of psychology. It is true also that most of us are familiar with his articles on the importance of Husserl's conception of the life-world for a philosophy of the natural and social sciences. But these publications taken together do not give us a clear picture of precisely how he conceived of philosophy of science and the . important contributions he has undoubtedly made in this realm. To ' An international conference on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Gurwitsch's Phenomenological Theory of Natural Science

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 5 (1): 29 – Jan 1, 1975

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1975 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916475X00051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

29 Gurwitsch's Phenomenological Theory of Natural Science JOSEPH J. KOCKELMANS o On another occasion I made the remark that in my view Aron Gurwitsch has made substantial constributions to contemporary philos- ophy in at least four different realms, namely transcendental phenomenol- ogy, psychology, philosophy of science, and the history of philosophy. I I continue to maintain this view. Since other speakers have already focussed on three of these themes, I shall limit myself to making several observa- , tions on his philosophy of science. Gurwitsch's interest in and knowledge of the philosophy of science is to some extent known only to his closer friends. It is obviously true that everyone present here knows about Gurwitsch's publications on the philos- ophy of the social sciences and particularly of psychology. It is true also that most of us are familiar with his articles on the importance of Husserl's conception of the life-world for a philosophy of the natural and social sciences. But these publications taken together do not give us a clear picture of precisely how he conceived of philosophy of science and the . important contributions he has undoubtedly made in this realm. To ' An international conference on

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1975

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