Guest Editors' Introduction

Guest Editors' Introduction 103 Guest Editors' Introduction Through the Geographical Looking Glass: Space, Place, and Society-Animal Relations Chris Philo UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Jennifer Wolch1 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA As geographers interested in human-animal relations, a recent paper in Society & Animals immediately caught our eye on account of its main title, "Safe in Unsafe Places" (Gillespie, Leffler & Lemer, 1996). The study explores how human interactions in certain types of places are altered by the presence of dogs popularly perceived to be aggressive. Adopting a participant observation role as dog enthu- siasts travelling around the country attending dog shows with their own Rottwei ler dogs, the authors uncover a range of shifting relations involving people, dogs and spatial-temporal settings. For instance, spaces normally seen as threatening or "unsafe" (such as a beach late at night) became much safer with the Rottweilers present. Conversely, spaces normally assumed to be "safe" (such as a village during the day) suddenly became unsafe because the big dogs prompted unpredictable reactions from other humans and also from other animals (leading to the possibility of pre-emptive strikes against both the researchers and their dogs). The researchers offered the following conclusions: Thus our experience of travel with dogs http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Society & Animals Brill

Guest Editors' Introduction

Society & Animals, Volume 6 (2): 103 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1998 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1063-1119
eISSN
1568-5306
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853098X00096
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

103 Guest Editors' Introduction Through the Geographical Looking Glass: Space, Place, and Society-Animal Relations Chris Philo UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Jennifer Wolch1 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA As geographers interested in human-animal relations, a recent paper in Society & Animals immediately caught our eye on account of its main title, "Safe in Unsafe Places" (Gillespie, Leffler & Lemer, 1996). The study explores how human interactions in certain types of places are altered by the presence of dogs popularly perceived to be aggressive. Adopting a participant observation role as dog enthu- siasts travelling around the country attending dog shows with their own Rottwei ler dogs, the authors uncover a range of shifting relations involving people, dogs and spatial-temporal settings. For instance, spaces normally seen as threatening or "unsafe" (such as a beach late at night) became much safer with the Rottweilers present. Conversely, spaces normally assumed to be "safe" (such as a village during the day) suddenly became unsafe because the big dogs prompted unpredictable reactions from other humans and also from other animals (leading to the possibility of pre-emptive strikes against both the researchers and their dogs). The researchers offered the following conclusions: Thus our experience of travel with dogs

Journal

Society & AnimalsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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