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Gray Morning

Gray Morning 234 REVIEW ARTICLES Gray Morning Todd May. Between Genealogy and Epistemology: Psychology, Politics, and Knowledge in the Thought of Michel Foucault. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 1993. 136 pp., including index. Todd May has done a remarkable thing; he has written and published three books within three years: Between Genealogy and Epistemology-the explicit focus of this essay-(in 1993), The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism (in 1994), and The Moral Theory of Poststructuralism (in 1995).1 The three books are connected, each un- folding from an issue left unresolved in the preceding one. The first book, Between Genealogy and Epistemology, takes up the issue of whether Foucaultian genealogy falls into a self-refuting epistemological relativ- ism (cf. PPPA, 93 n. 17). After resolving this issue, it ends by discuss- ing the micropolitics implied by genealogy. In turn, the second book takes up genealogical micropolitics in terms of the anarchism it im- plies ; micropolitics implies anarchism because Foucault and Deleuze and Lyotard-who define poststructuralism for May-deny a universal principle which particular cases would or should represent, what May calls their "anti-representationalism." The second book ends with a chapter entitled "Questions of Ethics" in which May engages in a "defense" http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916497X00138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

234 REVIEW ARTICLES Gray Morning Todd May. Between Genealogy and Epistemology: Psychology, Politics, and Knowledge in the Thought of Michel Foucault. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 1993. 136 pp., including index. Todd May has done a remarkable thing; he has written and published three books within three years: Between Genealogy and Epistemology-the explicit focus of this essay-(in 1993), The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism (in 1994), and The Moral Theory of Poststructuralism (in 1995).1 The three books are connected, each un- folding from an issue left unresolved in the preceding one. The first book, Between Genealogy and Epistemology, takes up the issue of whether Foucaultian genealogy falls into a self-refuting epistemological relativ- ism (cf. PPPA, 93 n. 17). After resolving this issue, it ends by discuss- ing the micropolitics implied by genealogy. In turn, the second book takes up genealogical micropolitics in terms of the anarchism it im- plies ; micropolitics implies anarchism because Foucault and Deleuze and Lyotard-who define poststructuralism for May-deny a universal principle which particular cases would or should represent, what May calls their "anti-representationalism." The second book ends with a chapter entitled "Questions of Ethics" in which May engages in a "defense"

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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