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Grassi's Experiment: The Renaissance through Phenomenology

Grassi's Experiment: The Renaissance through Phenomenology 233 Grassi's Experiment: The Renaissance through Phenomenology MICHAEL HEIM Redondo Beach, California INTRODUCTION: THE BACKGROUND OF GRASSIS'S WORK After recently completing the final revisions on his major historical study, The Phenomenological Movement, Herbert Spiegelberg stepped back to reflect on the experience of Phenomenology-not from the external perspective of the historian, but from the intuitive awareness of one who has been engaged in the active constitution of the historical movement itself.' His perceptions touch on the present state of the development of Phenomenology: Time was when the Movement consisted merely of two open circles of advanced students and teachers at Gottingen and Munich in face-to- face solidarity, though not always in agreement with one another. This type of intimacy weakened after World War I as the Movement prolifer- ated and became more and more impersonal. Increasingly, names and titles of books replaced personal knowledge of the members of the Movement and their work. This impersonalization was bound to grow with the internationalization of Phenomenology after World War II. The larger the Movement, the vaguer became the awareness and knowledge of other co-Phenomenologists. Spiegelberg goes on to suggest that one "essential characteristic" of the Phenomenological Movement is the "tendency to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Grassi's Experiment: The Renaissance through Phenomenology

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 18 (1): 233 – Jan 1, 1988

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1988 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916488X00129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

233 Grassi's Experiment: The Renaissance through Phenomenology MICHAEL HEIM Redondo Beach, California INTRODUCTION: THE BACKGROUND OF GRASSIS'S WORK After recently completing the final revisions on his major historical study, The Phenomenological Movement, Herbert Spiegelberg stepped back to reflect on the experience of Phenomenology-not from the external perspective of the historian, but from the intuitive awareness of one who has been engaged in the active constitution of the historical movement itself.' His perceptions touch on the present state of the development of Phenomenology: Time was when the Movement consisted merely of two open circles of advanced students and teachers at Gottingen and Munich in face-to- face solidarity, though not always in agreement with one another. This type of intimacy weakened after World War I as the Movement prolifer- ated and became more and more impersonal. Increasingly, names and titles of books replaced personal knowledge of the members of the Movement and their work. This impersonalization was bound to grow with the internationalization of Phenomenology after World War II. The larger the Movement, the vaguer became the awareness and knowledge of other co-Phenomenologists. Spiegelberg goes on to suggest that one "essential characteristic" of the Phenomenological Movement is the "tendency to

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1988

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