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Governing China's Multiethnic Frontiers

Governing China's Multiethnic Frontiers Book Reviews Governing China’s Multiethnic Frontiers Morris Rossabi (ed.). Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004 ISBN 0-295-98390-6. $50.00. This new volume is a wonderfully convenient survey of the current political, cultural, and economic situation of China’s major borderland peoples. Seven essays survey the Hui, the Tai, the Inner Mongolians, Xinjiang’s Uighurs, and Tibetans. Important minorities that might have been covered but were not include Xinjiang’s Kazakhs, southern China’s Zhuang, Miao, and Yi, and the Koreans of Yanbian. Even so, the book offers ‘one-stop shopping’ for any teacher hoping to add a multiethnic element to a class on China, or any student of one border nationality looking for reliable contemporary information on another. The contributors differ not only in their area of expertise, but also in their disciplines. As a result, one learns quite a bit about each border people – there is hardly a weak paper in the collection – but not exactly the same things about each group. Jonathan Lipman, an anthropologist, focuses on the ethnic boundary between Hui and Han (ethnic Chinese) in the light of Hui diversity, legends of Islamic violence among the Hui, and the grassroots implementation of the state’s nationality policy. Mette Hanson, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

Governing China's Multiethnic Frontiers

Inner Asia , Volume 6 (2): 249 – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/146481704793647117
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews Governing China’s Multiethnic Frontiers Morris Rossabi (ed.). Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004 ISBN 0-295-98390-6. $50.00. This new volume is a wonderfully convenient survey of the current political, cultural, and economic situation of China’s major borderland peoples. Seven essays survey the Hui, the Tai, the Inner Mongolians, Xinjiang’s Uighurs, and Tibetans. Important minorities that might have been covered but were not include Xinjiang’s Kazakhs, southern China’s Zhuang, Miao, and Yi, and the Koreans of Yanbian. Even so, the book offers ‘one-stop shopping’ for any teacher hoping to add a multiethnic element to a class on China, or any student of one border nationality looking for reliable contemporary information on another. The contributors differ not only in their area of expertise, but also in their disciplines. As a result, one learns quite a bit about each border people – there is hardly a weak paper in the collection – but not exactly the same things about each group. Jonathan Lipman, an anthropologist, focuses on the ethnic boundary between Hui and Han (ethnic Chinese) in the light of Hui diversity, legends of Islamic violence among the Hui, and the grassroots implementation of the state’s nationality policy. Mette Hanson,

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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