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Globalization, Security, and Migration: The Case of Turkey

Globalization, Security, and Migration: The Case of Turkey Global Governance 6 (2000), 383–398 Globalization, Security, and Migration: The Case of Turkey Ahmet Içduygu and E. Fuat Keyman he idea that intense processes of globalization force us to rethink the state-centric approach to the issue of security in the post–Cold T War era is gaining currency in both academic and public discourse. The world is no longer marked by the sense of certainty, trust, and security modernity is supposed to provide in societal and international relations. From ethnic and religious cleansing to environmental hazards, a funda- mental shift has occurred in the meaning and actors of security relations. And what Anthony Giddens terms “ontological uncertainty/insecurity” is becoming a constitutive element of life in the post–Cold War era. At a time when “writing security” involves not only interstate relations but also (and more important) identity, body, and ecology and when “the greater dangers and contingencies are global in character,” there is a need to go beyond the state-centric approach and analyze critically the link between globalization and security. If processes of globalization have the potential to make the issue of security a complex, complicated, and multidimen- sional one whose ambiguous nature cannot be captured within the limits of interstate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-00603006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 6 (2000), 383–398 Globalization, Security, and Migration: The Case of Turkey Ahmet Içduygu and E. Fuat Keyman he idea that intense processes of globalization force us to rethink the state-centric approach to the issue of security in the post–Cold T War era is gaining currency in both academic and public discourse. The world is no longer marked by the sense of certainty, trust, and security modernity is supposed to provide in societal and international relations. From ethnic and religious cleansing to environmental hazards, a funda- mental shift has occurred in the meaning and actors of security relations. And what Anthony Giddens terms “ontological uncertainty/insecurity” is becoming a constitutive element of life in the post–Cold War era. At a time when “writing security” involves not only interstate relations but also (and more important) identity, body, and ecology and when “the greater dangers and contingencies are global in character,” there is a need to go beyond the state-centric approach and analyze critically the link between globalization and security. If processes of globalization have the potential to make the issue of security a complex, complicated, and multidimen- sional one whose ambiguous nature cannot be captured within the limits of interstate

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2000

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