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Globalization

Globalization Global Governance 5 (1999), 483–496 David Held and Anthony McGrew, with David Goldblatt and Jonathan Perraton Globalization: n. a process (or set of processes) that embodies a trans- formation in the spatial organization of social relations and transactions, generating transcontinental or interregional flows and networks of activ- ity, interaction, and power. A lthough everybody talks about globalization, few people have a clear un- derstanding of it. The “big idea” of the late twentieth century is in danger of turning into the cliché of our times. Can we give it precise meaning and content, or should globalization be consigned to the dustbin of history? The reason there is so much talk about globalization is that everyone knows that something extraordinary is happening to our world. We can send e-mail across the planet in seconds; we hear that our jobs depend on economic decisions in far-off places; we enjoy films, food, and fashion from all over the world; we worry about an influx of drugs and how we can save the ozone layer. These growing global connections affect all aspects of our lives—but it is still not clear what globalization really means. There has been a heated debate about whether globalization http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-00504005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 5 (1999), 483–496 David Held and Anthony McGrew, with David Goldblatt and Jonathan Perraton Globalization: n. a process (or set of processes) that embodies a trans- formation in the spatial organization of social relations and transactions, generating transcontinental or interregional flows and networks of activ- ity, interaction, and power. A lthough everybody talks about globalization, few people have a clear un- derstanding of it. The “big idea” of the late twentieth century is in danger of turning into the cliché of our times. Can we give it precise meaning and content, or should globalization be consigned to the dustbin of history? The reason there is so much talk about globalization is that everyone knows that something extraordinary is happening to our world. We can send e-mail across the planet in seconds; we hear that our jobs depend on economic decisions in far-off places; we enjoy films, food, and fashion from all over the world; we worry about an influx of drugs and how we can save the ozone layer. These growing global connections affect all aspects of our lives—but it is still not clear what globalization really means. There has been a heated debate about whether globalization

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 1999

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