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Global Governance, the United Nations, and the Challenge of Trumping Trump

Global Governance, the United Nations, and the Challenge of Trumping Trump Global Governance 23 (2017), 143–149 GLOBAL FORUM Global Governance, the United Nations, and the Challenge of Trumping Trump Bruce W. Jentleson I WISH, DEAR COLLEAGUES, THAT I COULD PROVIDE “IT WON’T BE SO BAD” reassurance. Or that given that I served as a foreign policy adviser to the Hillary Clinton campaign and in previous Democratic administrations, that it’s my sour grapes. The end may not be nigh, but I can’t but be pessimistic about President Donald Trump and global governance and the United Nations in particular. There are three bases for this view. First is the overall “America First” approach to foreign policy. When this term was coined in the 1930s, it was by isolationist groups seeking to keep the United States out of the war in Europe. Trump’s version is not iso- lationism in the sense of just coming home and pulling up the drawbridges. It is an assertive nationalism that imposes the costs and burdens on others: the 45 percent surcharge on Chinese imports, the wall against and paid for by Mexico, the you-owe-us to traditional allies, the you-deal-with-them ban on refugees and Muslims entering the United States. Some of the specifics may vary now in office; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Global Governance, the United Nations, and the Challenge of Trumping Trump

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02302001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 23 (2017), 143–149 GLOBAL FORUM Global Governance, the United Nations, and the Challenge of Trumping Trump Bruce W. Jentleson I WISH, DEAR COLLEAGUES, THAT I COULD PROVIDE “IT WON’T BE SO BAD” reassurance. Or that given that I served as a foreign policy adviser to the Hillary Clinton campaign and in previous Democratic administrations, that it’s my sour grapes. The end may not be nigh, but I can’t but be pessimistic about President Donald Trump and global governance and the United Nations in particular. There are three bases for this view. First is the overall “America First” approach to foreign policy. When this term was coined in the 1930s, it was by isolationist groups seeking to keep the United States out of the war in Europe. Trump’s version is not iso- lationism in the sense of just coming home and pulling up the drawbridges. It is an assertive nationalism that imposes the costs and burdens on others: the 45 percent surcharge on Chinese imports, the wall against and paid for by Mexico, the you-owe-us to traditional allies, the you-deal-with-them ban on refugees and Muslims entering the United States. Some of the specifics may vary now in office;

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2017

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