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Global Environmental Politics: From Person to Planet. Edited by Simon Nicholson and Paul Wapner. Boulder: Paradigm, 2014.

Global Environmental Politics: From Person to Planet. Edited by Simon Nicholson and Paul Wapner.... Book Reviews 183 neering laws and reforming justice systems so that they resemble those of Western democracies. The hoped-for result was that the reforms would lead to less poverty, more secure human rights, and a conflict-free future for the people in those states. More often than not, the lofty goals of rule of law reform efforts have not been achieved. One can readily recall the “state- building failures—such as in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, Iraq, and South Sudan” (p. xiii). Nevertheless, the Western rule of law model persists in promoting a one-size-fits-all solution. Why is the present model producing unsatisfactory results? Is there a better way to aid fractured states in rebuilding? What challenges do exter- nal actors face when they seek to help a state rebuild? These are among the questions that the authors of the chapters in this volume admirably tackle. While each contribution is unique in its arguments and evidence, a theme resonates: those engaging in rule of law reform should consider the coun- try’s political and social context. In the case of South Sudan, Mareike Schomerus cautions that rule of law programmers must accept that the country contains a “unique society with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Global Environmental Politics: From Person to Planet. Edited by Simon Nicholson and Paul Wapner. Boulder: Paradigm, 2014.

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02101015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 183 neering laws and reforming justice systems so that they resemble those of Western democracies. The hoped-for result was that the reforms would lead to less poverty, more secure human rights, and a conflict-free future for the people in those states. More often than not, the lofty goals of rule of law reform efforts have not been achieved. One can readily recall the “state- building failures—such as in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, Iraq, and South Sudan” (p. xiii). Nevertheless, the Western rule of law model persists in promoting a one-size-fits-all solution. Why is the present model producing unsatisfactory results? Is there a better way to aid fractured states in rebuilding? What challenges do exter- nal actors face when they seek to help a state rebuild? These are among the questions that the authors of the chapters in this volume admirably tackle. While each contribution is unique in its arguments and evidence, a theme resonates: those engaging in rule of law reform should consider the coun- try’s political and social context. In the case of South Sudan, Mareike Schomerus cautions that rule of law programmers must accept that the country contains a “unique society with

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2015

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