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Getting Away with Torture

Getting Away with Torture Global Governance 11 (2005), 389–406 REVIEW ESSAY Kenneth Roth The Bush administration’s use of torture and inhumane treatment has undermined one of the most basic global standards governing how gov- ernments can treat people under their control. Contrary to the efforts of the administration to pass this abuse off as the spontaneous misconduct of a few low-level soldiers, ample evidence demonstrates that it reflects policy decisions taken at the highest levels of the U.S. government. Repairing the damage done to global standards will require acknowl- edging this policy role and launching a genuinely independent investi- gation to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. The cre- ation of regulated exceptions to the absolute prohibition of torture and mistreatment, as suggested by several academics, will not redeem the tarnished reputation of the United States or restore the global standards that the Bush administration has so severely damaged. KEYWORDS: torture, Abu Ghraib, Guatánamo, interrogation, cruel treatment. B’Tselem, “Legislation Allowing the Use of Physical Force and Mental Coercion in Interrogations by the General Security Service,” B’Tselem Position Paper, January 2000, 80 pp. Mark Danner, Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror (New York: New York Review of Books, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01103008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 11 (2005), 389–406 REVIEW ESSAY Kenneth Roth The Bush administration’s use of torture and inhumane treatment has undermined one of the most basic global standards governing how gov- ernments can treat people under their control. Contrary to the efforts of the administration to pass this abuse off as the spontaneous misconduct of a few low-level soldiers, ample evidence demonstrates that it reflects policy decisions taken at the highest levels of the U.S. government. Repairing the damage done to global standards will require acknowl- edging this policy role and launching a genuinely independent investi- gation to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. The cre- ation of regulated exceptions to the absolute prohibition of torture and mistreatment, as suggested by several academics, will not redeem the tarnished reputation of the United States or restore the global standards that the Bush administration has so severely damaged. KEYWORDS: torture, Abu Ghraib, Guatánamo, interrogation, cruel treatment. B’Tselem, “Legislation Allowing the Use of Physical Force and Mental Coercion in Interrogations by the General Security Service,” B’Tselem Position Paper, January 2000, 80 pp. Mark Danner, Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror (New York: New York Review of Books,

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2005

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