Geometric analysis of intrusive growth of wood fibres in Robinia pseudoacacia

Geometric analysis of intrusive growth of wood fibres in Robinia pseudoacacia All cell types of the secondary xylem arise from the meristematic cells (initials) of the vascular cambium and grow under mechanical constraints emerging from the circular-symmetrical geometry that characterises many tree trunks. The course of intrusive growth of cambial initials has been elucidated, but is yet to be described in the case of xylem fibres. This study explains the geometry of intrusive growth of the secondary xylem fibres in the trunk of Robinia pseudoacacia. Long series of serial semi-thin sections of the vascular cambium and the differentiating secondary xylem were analysed. Since fibres grow in close vicinity to expanding cells of the derivatives of the vascular cambium, we assumed that they have similar growth conditions. Dealing with the cylindrical tissue of the vascular cambium in a previous study, we used a circularly symmetrical equation for describing the growth mechanism of cambial initials. Like the cambial initials, some of the cambial derivatives differentiating into the various cell types composing the secondary xylem also exhibit intrusive growth between the tangential walls of adjacent cells. As seen in cross sections of the cambium, intrusively growing initials form slanted walls by a gradual transformation of tangential (periclinal) walls into radial (anticlinal) walls. Similarly, the intrusive growth of xylem fibres manifests initially as slants, which are formed due to axial growth of the growing cell tips along the tangential walls of adjacent cells. During this process, the tangential walls of adjacent cells are partly separated and dislocated from the tangential plane. The final shape of xylem fibres, or that of vessel elements and axial parenchyma cells, depends upon the ratio of their intrusive versus symplastic growths in the axial, circumferential and radial directions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png IAWA Journal Brill

Geometric analysis of intrusive growth of wood fibres in Robinia pseudoacacia

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0928-1541
eISSN
2294-1932
D.O.I.
10.1163/22941932-20170204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

All cell types of the secondary xylem arise from the meristematic cells (initials) of the vascular cambium and grow under mechanical constraints emerging from the circular-symmetrical geometry that characterises many tree trunks. The course of intrusive growth of cambial initials has been elucidated, but is yet to be described in the case of xylem fibres. This study explains the geometry of intrusive growth of the secondary xylem fibres in the trunk of Robinia pseudoacacia. Long series of serial semi-thin sections of the vascular cambium and the differentiating secondary xylem were analysed. Since fibres grow in close vicinity to expanding cells of the derivatives of the vascular cambium, we assumed that they have similar growth conditions. Dealing with the cylindrical tissue of the vascular cambium in a previous study, we used a circularly symmetrical equation for describing the growth mechanism of cambial initials. Like the cambial initials, some of the cambial derivatives differentiating into the various cell types composing the secondary xylem also exhibit intrusive growth between the tangential walls of adjacent cells. As seen in cross sections of the cambium, intrusively growing initials form slanted walls by a gradual transformation of tangential (periclinal) walls into radial (anticlinal) walls. Similarly, the intrusive growth of xylem fibres manifests initially as slants, which are formed due to axial growth of the growing cell tips along the tangential walls of adjacent cells. During this process, the tangential walls of adjacent cells are partly separated and dislocated from the tangential plane. The final shape of xylem fibres, or that of vessel elements and axial parenchyma cells, depends upon the ratio of their intrusive versus symplastic growths in the axial, circumferential and radial directions.

Journal

IAWA JournalBrill

Published: Feb 20, 2018

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