Geographic variation in female mate-copying in the species complex of a unisexual fish, Poecilia formosa

Geographic variation in female mate-copying in the species complex of a unisexual fish, Poecilia... Geographic variation in female mate-copying in the species complex of a unisexual fish, Poecilia formosa Katja U. Heubel 1,2,3) , Katja Hornhardt 1) , Tanja Ollmann 1) , Jakob Parzefall 1) , Michael J. Ryan 2) & Ingo Schlupp 1,2,4) ( 1 Universität Hamburg, Biozentrum Grindel, Hamburg, Germany; 2 University of Texas, Section of Integrative Biology, Austin, TX 78712, USA) (Accepted: 19 February 2008) Summary The Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa , is a gynogenetic, all-female fish. Its mating system relies on heterospecific matings with males of closely related sexual species. In mixed popu- lations, males mate with conspecific sexual females and heterospecific asexual females. Such matings are not isolated dyadic interactions but rather elements of a communication net- work, because multiple females can observe these interactions. This is the only known case of heterospecific mate-copying and, thus, a system in which the potential for mate-copying could be influenced by the presence of another species. Here we show that mate-copying is exhibited by the sexual species P. mexicana and P. latipinna , and the asexual P. formosa . Both sexual and asexual females copy each other’s mate choice decisions in sympatry, but females from allopatric populations do not show http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Geographic variation in female mate-copying in the species complex of a unisexual fish, Poecilia formosa

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/geographic-variation-in-female-mate-copying-in-the-species-complex-of-7yEaMPqQOJ
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853908784474533
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Geographic variation in female mate-copying in the species complex of a unisexual fish, Poecilia formosa Katja U. Heubel 1,2,3) , Katja Hornhardt 1) , Tanja Ollmann 1) , Jakob Parzefall 1) , Michael J. Ryan 2) & Ingo Schlupp 1,2,4) ( 1 Universität Hamburg, Biozentrum Grindel, Hamburg, Germany; 2 University of Texas, Section of Integrative Biology, Austin, TX 78712, USA) (Accepted: 19 February 2008) Summary The Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa , is a gynogenetic, all-female fish. Its mating system relies on heterospecific matings with males of closely related sexual species. In mixed popu- lations, males mate with conspecific sexual females and heterospecific asexual females. Such matings are not isolated dyadic interactions but rather elements of a communication net- work, because multiple females can observe these interactions. This is the only known case of heterospecific mate-copying and, thus, a system in which the potential for mate-copying could be influenced by the presence of another species. Here we show that mate-copying is exhibited by the sexual species P. mexicana and P. latipinna , and the asexual P. formosa . Both sexual and asexual females copy each other’s mate choice decisions in sympatry, but females from allopatric populations do not show

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: SEXUAL-ASEXUAL COEXISTENCE; MALE MATING BEHAVIOUR; ASSOCIATION PREFERENCES; VIDEO PLAYBACK; FEMALE CHOICE; EVOLUTION OF MATE-COPYING; VISUAL COMMUNICATION

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off