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Gendering Chinese Religion: Subject, Identity, and Body , edited by Jinhua Jia, Xiaofei Kang, and Ping Yao, 2014

Gendering Chinese Religion: Subject, Identity, and Body , edited by Jinhua Jia, Xiaofei Kang, and... represents an important and groundbreaking contribution to the study of Chinese religions, specifically with respect to women and (female) gender. As the editors claim, this edited volume will help to establish a subfield on women, gender, and religion in Chinese Studies. Given that the book attempts to be located in both Chinese Studies/Asian Studies and Religious Studies, I will review it along both trajectories. Generally speaking, and as one might expect given the standard training and established approaches in Sinology, the various chapters are strong in terms of area studies and slightly less successful with respect to theory and method related to the academic study of religion. Specifically, while the authors demonstrate familiarity with major theories and theorists outside of Chinese Studies narrowly defined, their application and employment are somewhat underdeveloped. As is often the case, it occasionally feels as though theory and “data sets” lack thorough integration. The book chapters originated from the first International Conference on Women and Gender in Chinese Religion (University of Macau, June 17–20, 2011), and range from the early medieval period to the present. The volume consists of an introduction and three parts, titled “Restoring Female Religiosity and Subjectivity,” “Redefining Identity and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NAN NÜ Brill

Gendering Chinese Religion: Subject, Identity, and Body , edited by Jinhua Jia, Xiaofei Kang, and Ping Yao, 2014

NAN NÜ , Volume 17 (2): 360 – Mar 24, 2015

Gendering Chinese Religion: Subject, Identity, and Body , edited by Jinhua Jia, Xiaofei Kang, and Ping Yao, 2014


represents an important and groundbreaking contribution to the study of Chinese religions, specifically with respect to women and (female) gender. As the editors claim, this edited volume will help to establish a subfield on women, gender, and religion in Chinese Studies. Given that the book attempts to be located in both Chinese Studies/Asian Studies and Religious Studies, I will review it along both trajectories. Generally speaking, and as one might expect given the standard training and established approaches in Sinology, the various chapters are strong in terms of area studies and slightly less successful with respect to theory and method related to the academic study of religion. Specifically, while the authors demonstrate familiarity with major theories and theorists outside of Chinese Studies narrowly defined, their application and employment are somewhat underdeveloped. As is often the case, it occasionally feels as though theory and “data sets” lack thorough integration. The book chapters originated from the first International Conference on Women and Gender in Chinese Religion (University of Macau, June 17–20, 2011), and range from the early medieval period to the present. The volume consists of an introduction and three parts, titled “Restoring Female Religiosity and Subjectivity,” “Redefining Identity and Tradition,” and “Rediscovering Bodily Differences,” each of which includes three chapters. Developing and going beyond the foundational work of Judith Berling, ­Suzanne Cahill, Catherine Despeux, Patricia Ebrey, Charlotte Furth, Beata Grant, Livia Kohn, and Chün-fang Yü, among others, Gendering Chinese Religion is noteworthy for its inclusion of international and younger female Chinese scholars, of less common materials such as epigraphy (Ping Yao), fiction (Zhange Ni), political materials (Xiaofei Kang), and theater (Kang), as well as of less researched topics such as Buddhist...
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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1387-6805
eISSN
1568-5268
DOI
10.1163/15685268-00172p17
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

represents an important and groundbreaking contribution to the study of Chinese religions, specifically with respect to women and (female) gender. As the editors claim, this edited volume will help to establish a subfield on women, gender, and religion in Chinese Studies. Given that the book attempts to be located in both Chinese Studies/Asian Studies and Religious Studies, I will review it along both trajectories. Generally speaking, and as one might expect given the standard training and established approaches in Sinology, the various chapters are strong in terms of area studies and slightly less successful with respect to theory and method related to the academic study of religion. Specifically, while the authors demonstrate familiarity with major theories and theorists outside of Chinese Studies narrowly defined, their application and employment are somewhat underdeveloped. As is often the case, it occasionally feels as though theory and “data sets” lack thorough integration. The book chapters originated from the first International Conference on Women and Gender in Chinese Religion (University of Macau, June 17–20, 2011), and range from the early medieval period to the present. The volume consists of an introduction and three parts, titled “Restoring Female Religiosity and Subjectivity,” “Redefining Identity and

Journal

NAN NÜBrill

Published: Mar 24, 2015

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