Further Records of Meiofauna Predation and Implications for the Community Stability

Further Records of Meiofauna Predation and Implications for the Community Stability NOTES AND NEWS FURTHER RECORDS OF MEIOFAUNA PREDATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE COMMUNITY STABILITY BY DAVID C. HOCKIN Culterty Field Station, Department of Zoology, University of Aberdeen, Newburgh, Ellon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, U.K. The importance of predation in regulating terrestrial herbivore populations has been emphasised by Hairston et al. (1960). Although their argument is not directly applicable to marine ecosystems (Steele, 1974), Fleeger (1980) con- cludes, in the absence of species microhabitat specialisations, that predation must regulate the populations within the meiofauna community. A similar conclusion was reached by Bell & Coull (1978). Predation of the meiofauna has been reported for fish (Arlt, 1973; Arndt & Nehls, 1964; Braber & Groot, 1973; Bregnballe, 1961; Feller & Kaczynski, 1975; Healey, unpubl., 1971, 1972; Silbert et al., 1978; Summers, unpubl., 1979), for larger crustaceans (Bell & Coull, 1978; Sameoto, 1969; Sikora, unpubl.), for turbellarians (McIntyre et al., 1970), by coelenterates (Muus, 1966) and Halacarida (McIntyre, 1964). During a study of the Harpacticoida (Crustacea, Copepoda) of a small inter- tidal sand beach in the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, predation of the meiofauna by previously unreported predators has been observed. Preda- tion of the interstitial Harpacticoid species Arenopontia subterranea Kunz, of the family http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

Further Records of Meiofauna Predation and Implications for the Community Stability

Crustaceana, Volume 42 (1-2): 106 – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1982 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854082X00759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NOTES AND NEWS FURTHER RECORDS OF MEIOFAUNA PREDATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE COMMUNITY STABILITY BY DAVID C. HOCKIN Culterty Field Station, Department of Zoology, University of Aberdeen, Newburgh, Ellon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, U.K. The importance of predation in regulating terrestrial herbivore populations has been emphasised by Hairston et al. (1960). Although their argument is not directly applicable to marine ecosystems (Steele, 1974), Fleeger (1980) con- cludes, in the absence of species microhabitat specialisations, that predation must regulate the populations within the meiofauna community. A similar conclusion was reached by Bell & Coull (1978). Predation of the meiofauna has been reported for fish (Arlt, 1973; Arndt & Nehls, 1964; Braber & Groot, 1973; Bregnballe, 1961; Feller & Kaczynski, 1975; Healey, unpubl., 1971, 1972; Silbert et al., 1978; Summers, unpubl., 1979), for larger crustaceans (Bell & Coull, 1978; Sameoto, 1969; Sikora, unpubl.), for turbellarians (McIntyre et al., 1970), by coelenterates (Muus, 1966) and Halacarida (McIntyre, 1964). During a study of the Harpacticoida (Crustacea, Copepoda) of a small inter- tidal sand beach in the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, predation of the meiofauna by previously unreported predators has been observed. Preda- tion of the interstitial Harpacticoid species Arenopontia subterranea Kunz, of the family

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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