From Vietnam to Iraq: American Elites' Views on the Use of Military Force

From Vietnam to Iraq: American Elites' Views on the Use of Military Force © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156913307X187450 From Vietnam to Iraq: American Elites’ Views on the Use of Military Force Gwen Moore and Stephanie Mack University at Albany, State University of New York, USA g.moore@albany.edu; Mack137@gmail.com Abstract In this paper we present trends in US elites’ opinions on the use of military force abroad in the period from the end of US military involvement in Vietnam in 1975 to 2004 during the ‘war on terror.’ With data from quadrennial surveys of US elites’ foreign policy attitudes sponsored by the Chicago Council on Foreign Rela- tions since 1975, we ask whether elites have become more militaristic or whether such views have been a long term characteristic of US elites. We find support for the view of United States leaders as prone to the use of military might, even with- out the support of allies. Yet the findings also indicate that American elites have held this military view of reality for a long time. Keywords elites, leaders, foreign policy, militarism Introduction American foreign policy has often included the use of military force in other nations. Between the end of the Vietnam War in 1975 and the beginning of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Sociology Brill

From Vietnam to Iraq: American Elites' Views on the Use of Military Force

Comparative Sociology, Volume 6 (1-2): 215 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-1322
eISSN
1569-1330
D.O.I.
10.1163/156913307X187450
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156913307X187450 From Vietnam to Iraq: American Elites’ Views on the Use of Military Force Gwen Moore and Stephanie Mack University at Albany, State University of New York, USA g.moore@albany.edu; Mack137@gmail.com Abstract In this paper we present trends in US elites’ opinions on the use of military force abroad in the period from the end of US military involvement in Vietnam in 1975 to 2004 during the ‘war on terror.’ With data from quadrennial surveys of US elites’ foreign policy attitudes sponsored by the Chicago Council on Foreign Rela- tions since 1975, we ask whether elites have become more militaristic or whether such views have been a long term characteristic of US elites. We find support for the view of United States leaders as prone to the use of military might, even with- out the support of allies. Yet the findings also indicate that American elites have held this military view of reality for a long time. Keywords elites, leaders, foreign policy, militarism Introduction American foreign policy has often included the use of military force in other nations. Between the end of the Vietnam War in 1975 and the beginning of the

Journal

Comparative SociologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: FOREIGN POLICY; LEADERS; ELITES; MILITARISM

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