From the Editor

From the Editor Allow me to welcome you to this newest issue of The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review , the first of 2014. This issue contains three articles, the first of which is entitled “On Guard at BAMlag: Representations of Guards in the 1930s Gulag Press” by Alun Thomas of the University of Sheffield (United Kingdom). In his article, Mr. Thomas looks at a group of guards who watched over one of the many outlets of the Soviet penal system, known as the Gulag. Although the experiences of the Gulag’s prisoners during the 1930s has received considerable scholarly attention, Thomas’ study draws our attention to the depictions of the lesser understood Gulag guards, who in this article were responsible for watching the large camp of inmates who were constructing the Baikal-Amur Railway in the years preceding the Second World War. While newspapers depicted the guards as orderly and patriotic soldiers who were engaged in the struggle to develop the Soviet Union, Thomas reveals that an unusual contrast existed between the newspapers printed for the guards and those printed for the prisoners they watched. While criticism of the prisoners in their newspapers was often softened through the lens of rehabilitation, Thomas argues http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Soviet and Post Soviet Review Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Editorial
ISSN
1075-1262
eISSN
1876-3324
D.O.I.
10.1163/18763324-04101001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Allow me to welcome you to this newest issue of The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review , the first of 2014. This issue contains three articles, the first of which is entitled “On Guard at BAMlag: Representations of Guards in the 1930s Gulag Press” by Alun Thomas of the University of Sheffield (United Kingdom). In his article, Mr. Thomas looks at a group of guards who watched over one of the many outlets of the Soviet penal system, known as the Gulag. Although the experiences of the Gulag’s prisoners during the 1930s has received considerable scholarly attention, Thomas’ study draws our attention to the depictions of the lesser understood Gulag guards, who in this article were responsible for watching the large camp of inmates who were constructing the Baikal-Amur Railway in the years preceding the Second World War. While newspapers depicted the guards as orderly and patriotic soldiers who were engaged in the struggle to develop the Soviet Union, Thomas reveals that an unusual contrast existed between the newspapers printed for the guards and those printed for the prisoners they watched. While criticism of the prisoners in their newspapers was often softened through the lens of rehabilitation, Thomas argues

Journal

The Soviet and Post Soviet ReviewBrill

Published: Mar 19, 2014

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