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From Bilateralization to Europeanization: Continuities and Changes in the Legal, Political and Social Status of the Muslim Minority in Greece and the Greek Orthodox Minority in Turkey

From Bilateralization to Europeanization: Continuities and Changes in the Legal, Political and... Nesim eker* Greek­Turkish relations were quite problematic for most of the twentieth century. Stemming from a number of issues such as the Cyprus question and the continental shelf on the Aegean among others, bilateral relations between the two states were characterized by mistrust, tension and hostility to the extent that they have been defined as "a classic `adversarial dyad' and `enduring conflict' between neighbours", similar to the cases of Germany and France until 1945, Japan and China, the Serbs and the Albanians, Israel and the Palestinians or India and Pakistan, by an eminent scholar of Greek­Turkish bilateral relations.¹ Antagonistic bilateral relations severely affected the respective minorities of the two states; namely, the Muslim minority of Greece and the Greek Orthodox minority of Turkey. Except for the short-lived détente years in the early 1950s, they were subjected to discriminatory treatment. Their constitutional rights, emanating from being citizens of Greece and Turkey as well as the rights granted by an internationally sanctioned treaty which had arranged their rights, the Treaty of Lausanne (1923), and international conventions signed by the two states,² were frequently violated. Violations occurred in almost all aspects of life, such as identity, education, religious freedom and property http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

From Bilateralization to Europeanization: Continuities and Changes in the Legal, Political and Social Status of the Muslim Minority in Greece and the Greek Orthodox Minority in Turkey

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 11 (1): 123 – Nov 17, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90110041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nesim eker* Greek­Turkish relations were quite problematic for most of the twentieth century. Stemming from a number of issues such as the Cyprus question and the continental shelf on the Aegean among others, bilateral relations between the two states were characterized by mistrust, tension and hostility to the extent that they have been defined as "a classic `adversarial dyad' and `enduring conflict' between neighbours", similar to the cases of Germany and France until 1945, Japan and China, the Serbs and the Albanians, Israel and the Palestinians or India and Pakistan, by an eminent scholar of Greek­Turkish bilateral relations.¹ Antagonistic bilateral relations severely affected the respective minorities of the two states; namely, the Muslim minority of Greece and the Greek Orthodox minority of Turkey. Except for the short-lived détente years in the early 1950s, they were subjected to discriminatory treatment. Their constitutional rights, emanating from being citizens of Greece and Turkey as well as the rights granted by an internationally sanctioned treaty which had arranged their rights, the Treaty of Lausanne (1923), and international conventions signed by the two states,² were frequently violated. Violations occurred in almost all aspects of life, such as identity, education, religious freedom and property

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Nov 17, 2014

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