Free Institutions and Struggle for Freedom in Russian History

Free Institutions and Struggle for Freedom in Russian History DOI: 10.1163/157303510X12650378239919 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 Review of Central and East European Law 35 (2010) 7-25 Free Institutions and Struggle for Freedom in Russian History Nicholas S. Timasheff I. Introduction Stalin is no more. His power seems to have been smoothly transferred to a directorate of five headed by G. Malenkov. Historical experience shows however that collective dictatorships are unstable. Rivalry among the members usually breaks out and, sometimes, this results in the breakdown of the monolithic power structure. But political dislocation is never final; sooner or later, a new crystallization of power must take place. There is no way of predicting what this eventual crystallization will be. But statements about objective possibilities are not out of the question. They must be based on the well known property of the past to impose itself on the present and the future. The range of possibilities concerning Russia’s political future after Stalin’s demise depends on the fact whether, in her past, she has known only despotism and slavish submissiveness, or also free institutions and struggle for freedom. In this country [the U.S.A., FF], the first alternative is commonly taken for granted. This view has been forcefully expressed by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Central and East European Law Brill

Free Institutions and Struggle for Freedom in Russian History

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0925-9880
eISSN
1573-0352
D.O.I.
10.1163/157303510X12650378239919
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DOI: 10.1163/157303510X12650378239919 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 Review of Central and East European Law 35 (2010) 7-25 Free Institutions and Struggle for Freedom in Russian History Nicholas S. Timasheff I. Introduction Stalin is no more. His power seems to have been smoothly transferred to a directorate of five headed by G. Malenkov. Historical experience shows however that collective dictatorships are unstable. Rivalry among the members usually breaks out and, sometimes, this results in the breakdown of the monolithic power structure. But political dislocation is never final; sooner or later, a new crystallization of power must take place. There is no way of predicting what this eventual crystallization will be. But statements about objective possibilities are not out of the question. They must be based on the well known property of the past to impose itself on the present and the future. The range of possibilities concerning Russia’s political future after Stalin’s demise depends on the fact whether, in her past, she has known only despotism and slavish submissiveness, or also free institutions and struggle for freedom. In this country [the U.S.A., FF], the first alternative is commonly taken for granted. This view has been forcefully expressed by

Journal

Review of Central and East European LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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