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FOUR CLAY TABLETS FROM KASIA IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHNOLOGY, LEIDEN

FOUR CLAY TABLETS FROM KASIA IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHNOLOGY, LEIDEN Nandana Chutiwongs FOUR CLAY TABLETS FROM KASIA IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHNOLOGY, LEIDEN Objects made from the humble material of clay are often overlooked by collectors. Casual visitors to any museum also usually pass them by. However, they can teil us a lot about the civilizations that produced them, and a great deal more about cultural exchanges in ancient times, including the important matter of the transmission of ideas and art forms. This article, nevertheless, will specially confine itself only to four such tablets from India. These were presented to the museum in 1909 by Prof. Jean Philipe Vogel, renowned and eminent archaeologist and Sanskritist from the same university milieu as Pauline Lunsingh Scheurleer, to whom this Felicitation Volume is dedicated. Clay - the Substance of the Earth Clay has always been inseparable from human life, forming part of the good and bountiful earth that upholds and nourishes the living world. It is one of the best gifts ever given to mankind by Nature; readily available in most parts of the globe and pliable for easy moulding by hand. From the beginnings of civilization, man has made use of clay in innumerable ways. A layer of clay spread http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aziatische Kunst Brill

FOUR CLAY TABLETS FROM KASIA IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHNOLOGY, LEIDEN

Aziatische Kunst , Volume 38 (4): 7 – Jul 5, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2543-1749
DOI
10.1163/25431749-90000155
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nandana Chutiwongs FOUR CLAY TABLETS FROM KASIA IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHNOLOGY, LEIDEN Objects made from the humble material of clay are often overlooked by collectors. Casual visitors to any museum also usually pass them by. However, they can teil us a lot about the civilizations that produced them, and a great deal more about cultural exchanges in ancient times, including the important matter of the transmission of ideas and art forms. This article, nevertheless, will specially confine itself only to four such tablets from India. These were presented to the museum in 1909 by Prof. Jean Philipe Vogel, renowned and eminent archaeologist and Sanskritist from the same university milieu as Pauline Lunsingh Scheurleer, to whom this Felicitation Volume is dedicated. Clay - the Substance of the Earth Clay has always been inseparable from human life, forming part of the good and bountiful earth that upholds and nourishes the living world. It is one of the best gifts ever given to mankind by Nature; readily available in most parts of the globe and pliable for easy moulding by hand. From the beginnings of civilization, man has made use of clay in innumerable ways. A layer of clay spread

Journal

Aziatische KunstBrill

Published: Jul 5, 2008

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