Fishing for Self-determination: European Fisheries and Western Sahara – The Case of Ocean Resources in Africa’s Last Colony

Fishing for Self-determination: European Fisheries and Western Sahara – The Case of Ocean... Living Resources and Aquaculture Jeffrey Smith* Barrister and Lecturer in Law, Ottawa, Canada On 14 December, 2011, centuries of European fishing on Africa's Saharan coast came to an abrupt, unforeseen end. The European Parliament voted to reject the continuation of fishery arrangements for the European Community that began in 1988, had been earlier uninterrupted between Morocco and Spain since 1975, and which Spain had enjoyed since it first colonized Western Sahara in 1884. Although members of the European Parliament may not have intended the coincidence, the day also marked the anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly resolution on selfdetermination for non-self-governing peoples, which has its last significant application in the case of Western Sahara. As European fishing vessels began leaving Saharan waters, there were demands that a new treaty replace what Parliament had rejected, the EU-Morocco Fisheries Partnership Agreement.1 At the same time, members of Parliament insisted that the right of the Saharawi people of Western Sahara to sovereignty over their natural resources had to be respected. Parliament's rejection of the Agreement under its new power of review created by the Lisbon Treaty2 had proven to be a startling development. Western Sahara, known until 1975 as Spanish http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ocean Yearbook Online Brill

Fishing for Self-determination: European Fisheries and Western Sahara – The Case of Ocean Resources in Africa’s Last Colony

Ocean Yearbook Online, Volume 27 (1): 267 – Jan 1, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/fishing-for-self-determination-european-fisheries-and-western-sahara-hy01ywKqL7
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2013 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0191-8575
eISSN
2211-6001
D.O.I.
10.1163/22116001-90000162
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Living Resources and Aquaculture Jeffrey Smith* Barrister and Lecturer in Law, Ottawa, Canada On 14 December, 2011, centuries of European fishing on Africa's Saharan coast came to an abrupt, unforeseen end. The European Parliament voted to reject the continuation of fishery arrangements for the European Community that began in 1988, had been earlier uninterrupted between Morocco and Spain since 1975, and which Spain had enjoyed since it first colonized Western Sahara in 1884. Although members of the European Parliament may not have intended the coincidence, the day also marked the anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly resolution on selfdetermination for non-self-governing peoples, which has its last significant application in the case of Western Sahara. As European fishing vessels began leaving Saharan waters, there were demands that a new treaty replace what Parliament had rejected, the EU-Morocco Fisheries Partnership Agreement.1 At the same time, members of Parliament insisted that the right of the Saharawi people of Western Sahara to sovereignty over their natural resources had to be respected. Parliament's rejection of the Agreement under its new power of review created by the Lisbon Treaty2 had proven to be a startling development. Western Sahara, known until 1975 as Spanish

Journal

Ocean Yearbook OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off