Filial Imprinting in an Altricial Bird: the Blackbird (Turdus Merula)

Filial Imprinting in an Altricial Bird: the Blackbird (Turdus Merula) FILIAL IMPRINTING IN AN ALTRICIAL BIRD: THE BLACKBIRD (TURDUS MERULA) by FELIX JUNCO1) (Departamento de Psicologia, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Valdés Salas, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain) (With 6 Figures) (Acc. 25-XI-1987) Introduction Since LORENZ (1935) emphasized the importance of imprinting, many experimental studies have been set up to discover the fundamental char- acteristics of this process (SLUCKIN, 1964; BATESON, 1966; HESS, 1973). A careful review of the literature on the subject shows that almost all studies deal with imprinting of a few species of precocial birds. If one understands this phenomenon as 'following behaviour' or as 'learning to follow' (MOLTZ, 1963) it would be nonsense to consider it in other species than nidifugous ones. We regard imprinting as a process, or set of pro- cesses, that restricts social preferences in the breeding of certain species to a specific class of objects (BATESON, 1966). Through imprinting the young animal is able to learn the visual and/or acoustical characteristics of its species and to direct its filial, and then sexual, behaviour towards its conspecifics. The main evidence about the existence of imprinting in altricial birds comes from the work on sexual imprinting (CRAIG, 1908; Nicolai, 1956; KLINGHAMMER & HESS, 1964; BROSSET, 1971; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Filial Imprinting in an Altricial Bird: the Blackbird (Turdus Merula)

Behaviour, Volume 106 (1-2): 25 – Jan 1, 1988

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1988 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853988X00070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

FILIAL IMPRINTING IN AN ALTRICIAL BIRD: THE BLACKBIRD (TURDUS MERULA) by FELIX JUNCO1) (Departamento de Psicologia, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Valdés Salas, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain) (With 6 Figures) (Acc. 25-XI-1987) Introduction Since LORENZ (1935) emphasized the importance of imprinting, many experimental studies have been set up to discover the fundamental char- acteristics of this process (SLUCKIN, 1964; BATESON, 1966; HESS, 1973). A careful review of the literature on the subject shows that almost all studies deal with imprinting of a few species of precocial birds. If one understands this phenomenon as 'following behaviour' or as 'learning to follow' (MOLTZ, 1963) it would be nonsense to consider it in other species than nidifugous ones. We regard imprinting as a process, or set of pro- cesses, that restricts social preferences in the breeding of certain species to a specific class of objects (BATESON, 1966). Through imprinting the young animal is able to learn the visual and/or acoustical characteristics of its species and to direct its filial, and then sexual, behaviour towards its conspecifics. The main evidence about the existence of imprinting in altricial birds comes from the work on sexual imprinting (CRAIG, 1908; Nicolai, 1956; KLINGHAMMER & HESS, 1964; BROSSET, 1971;

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1988

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