Fetishism and Ideology: A Reply to Dimoulis and Milios

Fetishism and Ideology: A Reply to Dimoulis and Milios Historical Materialism , volume 13:3 (193–218) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005 Also available online – www.brill.nl 1 Dimoulis and Milios 2004. 2 ‘. . . there is a kind of dissembling or duplicity built into the very economic structures of capitalism, such that it cannot help presenting itself to consciousness in ways askew to what it actually is. Mystification, so to speak, is an “objective” fact, embedded in the very character of the system: there is an unavoidable structural contradiction between that system’s real contents, and the phenomenal forms in which those contents proffer themselves spontaneously to the mind’. Eagleton 1991, p. 86. Mike Wayne Fetishism and Ideology: A Reply to Dimoulis and Milios Dimitri Dimoulis’s and John Milios’s essay 1 on the significance of the concept of commodity fetishism within Marxist theory opens up the opportunity to return to some key questions around the concept of ideology, which has largely died an unnatural death within the social sciences and cultural theory. In particular, it raises questions around the relationship between ideology and the mode of production, consciousness and practice, the determinate and reciprocal relations between mode of production and the superstructure, and the epistemological foundations for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Historical Materialism Brill

Fetishism and Ideology: A Reply to Dimoulis and Milios

Historical Materialism, Volume 13 (3): 193 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1465-4466
eISSN
1569-206X
D.O.I.
10.1163/1569206054927554
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Historical Materialism , volume 13:3 (193–218) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005 Also available online – www.brill.nl 1 Dimoulis and Milios 2004. 2 ‘. . . there is a kind of dissembling or duplicity built into the very economic structures of capitalism, such that it cannot help presenting itself to consciousness in ways askew to what it actually is. Mystification, so to speak, is an “objective” fact, embedded in the very character of the system: there is an unavoidable structural contradiction between that system’s real contents, and the phenomenal forms in which those contents proffer themselves spontaneously to the mind’. Eagleton 1991, p. 86. Mike Wayne Fetishism and Ideology: A Reply to Dimoulis and Milios Dimitri Dimoulis’s and John Milios’s essay 1 on the significance of the concept of commodity fetishism within Marxist theory opens up the opportunity to return to some key questions around the concept of ideology, which has largely died an unnatural death within the social sciences and cultural theory. In particular, it raises questions around the relationship between ideology and the mode of production, consciousness and practice, the determinate and reciprocal relations between mode of production and the superstructure, and the epistemological foundations for

Journal

Historical MaterialismBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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