Factors mediating inter-group encounters in savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus)

Factors mediating inter-group encounters in savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) FACTORS MEDIATING INTER-GROUP ENCOUNTERS IN SAVANNAH BABOONS (PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS URSINUS) by DAWN M. KITCHEN 1,2) , DOROTHY L. CHENEY 3) and ROBERT M. SEYFARTH 1,4) ( 1 Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, 19104, USA; 3 Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, 19104, USA) (Acc. 27-X-2003) Summary Inter-group encounters among baboons range from peaceful to aggressive. During 23 months we observed 110 inter-group interactions involving four groups of chacma baboons in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Results supported the hypothesis that male behavior functions to prevent extra-group males from gaining access to sexually receptive females. Males were more likely to chase females in their own group when estrous females were present, and their chases targeted estrous females more often than expected. Males also chased members of the opposing group more when estrous females were present. When estrous females were absent, male displays were shorter in duration, involved fewer participants, were less intense, and were more likely to result in peaceful mingling between groups. The alpha male was the individual most actively involved in inter-group chases and displays, but males of all ranks participated, especially when they were in consort with a female. However, males did http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Factors mediating inter-group encounters in savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/factors-mediating-inter-group-encounters-in-savannah-baboons-papio-PaGpfhx8in
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853904322890816
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

FACTORS MEDIATING INTER-GROUP ENCOUNTERS IN SAVANNAH BABOONS (PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS URSINUS) by DAWN M. KITCHEN 1,2) , DOROTHY L. CHENEY 3) and ROBERT M. SEYFARTH 1,4) ( 1 Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, 19104, USA; 3 Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, 19104, USA) (Acc. 27-X-2003) Summary Inter-group encounters among baboons range from peaceful to aggressive. During 23 months we observed 110 inter-group interactions involving four groups of chacma baboons in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Results supported the hypothesis that male behavior functions to prevent extra-group males from gaining access to sexually receptive females. Males were more likely to chase females in their own group when estrous females were present, and their chases targeted estrous females more often than expected. Males also chased members of the opposing group more when estrous females were present. When estrous females were absent, male displays were shorter in duration, involved fewer participants, were less intense, and were more likely to result in peaceful mingling between groups. The alpha male was the individual most actively involved in inter-group chases and displays, but males of all ranks participated, especially when they were in consort with a female. However, males did

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

Keywords: LOUD CALLS; RESOURCE DEFENSE; BABOONS; INTER-GROUP DOMINANCE; FEMALE DEFENSE.

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off