Factors affecting individual participation in group-level aggression among non-human primates

Factors affecting individual participation in group-level aggression among non-human primates Factors affecting individual participation in group-level aggression among non-human primates Dawn M. Kitchen 1,2) & Jacinta C. Beehner 3,4) ( 1 Department of Anthropology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; 3 Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; 4 Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA) (Accepted: 26 September 2007) Summary Group members do not always act cohesively when facing extra-group rivals. When benefits such as group-defence are not monopolizable, it poses an economics problem: who should contribute to public goods and who should freeload? A collective action framework com- pliments existing theoretical explanations for cooperation, and provides testable hypotheses about group-level behaviour based on individual costs and benefits. Using this approach, we review research on intergroup encounters in non-human primates published over the last 20 years, focusing on participation by different classes of individuals. While food- and mate- defence explain much between-sex variation in participation, rank and reproductive access frequently explain within-sex variation. In some species, individuals may use intergroup in- teractions to survey potential transfer locations and mating options, which might coincidently intimidate rivals. Experimental evidence suggests that when intergroup dominance is based on relative number http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Factors affecting individual participation in group-level aggression among non-human primates

Behaviour , Volume 144 (12): 1551 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853907782512074
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Factors affecting individual participation in group-level aggression among non-human primates Dawn M. Kitchen 1,2) & Jacinta C. Beehner 3,4) ( 1 Department of Anthropology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; 3 Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; 4 Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA) (Accepted: 26 September 2007) Summary Group members do not always act cohesively when facing extra-group rivals. When benefits such as group-defence are not monopolizable, it poses an economics problem: who should contribute to public goods and who should freeload? A collective action framework com- pliments existing theoretical explanations for cooperation, and provides testable hypotheses about group-level behaviour based on individual costs and benefits. Using this approach, we review research on intergroup encounters in non-human primates published over the last 20 years, focusing on participation by different classes of individuals. While food- and mate- defence explain much between-sex variation in participation, rank and reproductive access frequently explain within-sex variation. In some species, individuals may use intergroup in- teractions to survey potential transfer locations and mating options, which might coincidently intimidate rivals. Experimental evidence suggests that when intergroup dominance is based on relative number

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: COOPERATION; COMPETITION; PRIMATES; INTERGROUP ENCOUNTERS; COLLECTIVE ACTION PROBLEMS

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