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Exploring the New South American Regionalism (NSAR). Edited by Ernesto Vivares. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014.

Exploring the New South American Regionalism (NSAR). Edited by Ernesto Vivares. Farnham:... Book Reviews 495 der higher costs of intervention than should innocent beneficiaries and bystanders (chap. 7). Scholars interested in R2P and regime change should consult Alex Bellamy’s chapter, where he compiles data on regime changes and government-sponsored mass killing of civilians (chap. 10). Bellamy argues that regime change, which can and does occur by domestic actors as well as international ones, can be a necessary and legitimate means of dis- charging R2P under certain circumstances. Jennifer Welsh assesses the use of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and ethnic cleansing as R2P triggers in the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document (chap. 12). She concludes that, although there is greater consensus around the language after the 2005 World Summit, there is still controversy about when a trigger is met, she also argues that a focus on international crimes may require UN leaders to reconsider the principles, such as impartiality, on which they have operated in order to prevent and resolve conflict (pp. 217–218). David Rodin suggests that “human sovereignty,” which includes a right to collec- tive self-determination, should be the aim of AHI and should guide how it is executed (p. 243 and chap. 14). One error is that an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Exploring the New South American Regionalism (NSAR). Edited by Ernesto Vivares. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014.

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02103012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 495 der higher costs of intervention than should innocent beneficiaries and bystanders (chap. 7). Scholars interested in R2P and regime change should consult Alex Bellamy’s chapter, where he compiles data on regime changes and government-sponsored mass killing of civilians (chap. 10). Bellamy argues that regime change, which can and does occur by domestic actors as well as international ones, can be a necessary and legitimate means of dis- charging R2P under certain circumstances. Jennifer Welsh assesses the use of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and ethnic cleansing as R2P triggers in the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document (chap. 12). She concludes that, although there is greater consensus around the language after the 2005 World Summit, there is still controversy about when a trigger is met, she also argues that a focus on international crimes may require UN leaders to reconsider the principles, such as impartiality, on which they have operated in order to prevent and resolve conflict (pp. 217–218). David Rodin suggests that “human sovereignty,” which includes a right to collec- tive self-determination, should be the aim of AHI and should guide how it is executed (p. 243 and chap. 14). One error is that an

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2015

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