Exploratory Aggression in Chimpanzees

Exploratory Aggression in Chimpanzees EXPLORATORY AGGRESSION IN CHIMPANZEES by OTTO M. J. ADANG1) (Laboratory of Comparative Physiology, University of Utrecht, and Burgers' Zoo, Arnhem, the Netherlands) (With 5 Figures) (Acc. 2-II-1985) I. Introduction Young chimpanzees in the Arnhem Zoo chimpanzee colony often "bother" or "tease" adult group-members. This "teasing" behaviour is often referred to by terms such as "harassment", "provocative behaviour", etc. "Teasing" seems to be performed also by wild living chimpanzees and youngsters of other primate species; I defined it as quasi-aggressive behaviour (ADANG, 1984) and hypothesized that it is best explained as a form of social exploration, a means for youngsters to learn and expand social limits. Later I discovered that HEBB & THOMPSON (1954) had been the first to coin the term quasi-aggressive behaviour. Although they used the term to describe similar behaviour in chim- panzees, they did not see it as social exploration. In chimpanzees quasi-aggressive behaviour can consist of throwing sand or sticks at other individuals, hitting or kicking them, etc. While do- ing this their body posture is tense and already reveals their intention to dash away. The film made by HAANSTRA et al. (1984) contains some very good examples of quasi-aggressive behaviour. The data in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Exploratory Aggression in Chimpanzees

Behaviour, Volume 95 (1-2): 138 – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1985 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853985X00091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EXPLORATORY AGGRESSION IN CHIMPANZEES by OTTO M. J. ADANG1) (Laboratory of Comparative Physiology, University of Utrecht, and Burgers' Zoo, Arnhem, the Netherlands) (With 5 Figures) (Acc. 2-II-1985) I. Introduction Young chimpanzees in the Arnhem Zoo chimpanzee colony often "bother" or "tease" adult group-members. This "teasing" behaviour is often referred to by terms such as "harassment", "provocative behaviour", etc. "Teasing" seems to be performed also by wild living chimpanzees and youngsters of other primate species; I defined it as quasi-aggressive behaviour (ADANG, 1984) and hypothesized that it is best explained as a form of social exploration, a means for youngsters to learn and expand social limits. Later I discovered that HEBB & THOMPSON (1954) had been the first to coin the term quasi-aggressive behaviour. Although they used the term to describe similar behaviour in chim- panzees, they did not see it as social exploration. In chimpanzees quasi-aggressive behaviour can consist of throwing sand or sticks at other individuals, hitting or kicking them, etc. While do- ing this their body posture is tense and already reveals their intention to dash away. The film made by HAANSTRA et al. (1984) contains some very good examples of quasi-aggressive behaviour. The data in

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1985

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