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EU Enlargement and the Legal Framework of EU-China Investment Relations

EU Enlargement and the Legal Framework of EU-China Investment Relations In May 2004, the European Union realized its fifth enlargement, the largest in its history.' Ten new Member States joined the Union, which made it a union of twenty-five States. The ten new Member States are Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia (hereinafter collectively referred to as the EU 10; the EU Member States existing before May 2004 are collectively referred to as the EU 15).'- Bulgaria and Romania are hoping to also join the Union in 2007, whilst another candidate country, Turkey, is not currently negotiating its membership. The 2004 EU enlargement successfully expanded the boundary of the EU to embrace eight former communist counties with which China has had and maintained good relationships. Whilst this enlargement may not tremendously increase the general volume of EU investment in China, it probably will significantly promote Chinese investment in the EU. The legal framework of EU-China investment relations will likewise be modified by the enlargement,.3 This article thus deals with the legal framework governing the investment relations between China and the EU 10 States. It first explores the trade and investment relations between China and the EU 10 States and the applicable http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

EU Enlargement and the Legal Framework of EU-China Investment Relations

Journal of World Investment and Trade , Volume 6 (2): 25 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
DOI
10.1163/221190005X00073
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In May 2004, the European Union realized its fifth enlargement, the largest in its history.' Ten new Member States joined the Union, which made it a union of twenty-five States. The ten new Member States are Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia (hereinafter collectively referred to as the EU 10; the EU Member States existing before May 2004 are collectively referred to as the EU 15).'- Bulgaria and Romania are hoping to also join the Union in 2007, whilst another candidate country, Turkey, is not currently negotiating its membership. The 2004 EU enlargement successfully expanded the boundary of the EU to embrace eight former communist counties with which China has had and maintained good relationships. Whilst this enlargement may not tremendously increase the general volume of EU investment in China, it probably will significantly promote Chinese investment in the EU. The legal framework of EU-China investment relations will likewise be modified by the enlargement,.3 This article thus deals with the legal framework governing the investment relations between China and the EU 10 States. It first explores the trade and investment relations between China and the EU 10 States and the applicable

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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