Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ethnicity Along China's Southwestern Frontier

Ethnicity Along China's Southwestern Frontier © Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 ETHNICITY ALONG CHINA’S SOUTHWESTERN FRONTIER BY HEATHER A. PETERS (Office of the Regional Advisor for Culture in Asia and the Pacific, UNESCO) Abstract In China, a multi-ethnic nation-state whose national policy regarding ethnic groups is still in flux, ethnicity is a subject worthy of serious analysis. China plays lip service to cultural diversity within the nation-state, but it is a diversity that must fit within the boundaries drawn by the government. The officially recognized ethnic groups are discriminated against while receiving economic benefits. As far back as the second and first millennia bc , ethnic diversity has been recognized and recorded in China. Archaeologists and ethnohistorians today cite these earlier textual sources in their research and frequently associate them with archaeological material. These archaeological remains are then often directly connected with ethnic groups living in the same region today. In doing so, the archaeologists are linking today’s groups firmly within the framework of Chinese history, but they fail to address certain questions: what is the meaning of ethnicity itself? How was ethnicity perceived in the past? Is it the same as today? And can we in fact link those people living http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of East Asian Archaeology Brill

Ethnicity Along China's Southwestern Frontier

Journal of East Asian Archaeology , Volume 3 (1): 75 – Jan 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/ethnicity-along-china-s-southwestern-frontier-tqe4Do50F6
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1387-6813
eISSN
1568-5233
DOI
10.1163/156852301100402778
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 ETHNICITY ALONG CHINA’S SOUTHWESTERN FRONTIER BY HEATHER A. PETERS (Office of the Regional Advisor for Culture in Asia and the Pacific, UNESCO) Abstract In China, a multi-ethnic nation-state whose national policy regarding ethnic groups is still in flux, ethnicity is a subject worthy of serious analysis. China plays lip service to cultural diversity within the nation-state, but it is a diversity that must fit within the boundaries drawn by the government. The officially recognized ethnic groups are discriminated against while receiving economic benefits. As far back as the second and first millennia bc , ethnic diversity has been recognized and recorded in China. Archaeologists and ethnohistorians today cite these earlier textual sources in their research and frequently associate them with archaeological material. These archaeological remains are then often directly connected with ethnic groups living in the same region today. In doing so, the archaeologists are linking today’s groups firmly within the framework of Chinese history, but they fail to address certain questions: what is the meaning of ethnicity itself? How was ethnicity perceived in the past? Is it the same as today? And can we in fact link those people living

Journal

Journal of East Asian ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.