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Ethical Foundations of Ontology

Ethical Foundations of Ontology Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 37 (2007) 271–284 279 Ethical Foundations of Ontology Walter Brogan. Aristotle and Heidegger: The Twofoldness of Being. Albany: State University of New York, 2005. 211 pp. Walter Brogan’s book Aristotle and Heidegger: Th e Twofoldness of Being is an insightful analysis of the decisive impact Aristotle had on the development of Heidegger’s thinking. At the same time it also is a work of philosophy in its own right that uses Heidegger and Aristotle as the occasion to reflect on the nature of phenomenological method. In this review I will trace some of the major moments in Brogan’s book, focusing on his account of the twofoldness of being and then on the implications of this account for philosophical method. In chapter 1, “Martin Heidegger’s Relationship to Aristotle,” Brogan pre- sents philosophy as the artful practice of renewing shared meaning that becomes uprooted by overfamiliarity. Just as meaning shared in friendships and community must be renewed every so often, so too philosophy must return to the origin in which it is nourished. Brogan holds this view of Aristo- tle’s treatment of his predecessors; it is “not merely a preliminary inves tigation, but a philosophical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Ethical Foundations of Ontology

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 37 (2): 279 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916407X185700
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 37 (2007) 271–284 279 Ethical Foundations of Ontology Walter Brogan. Aristotle and Heidegger: The Twofoldness of Being. Albany: State University of New York, 2005. 211 pp. Walter Brogan’s book Aristotle and Heidegger: Th e Twofoldness of Being is an insightful analysis of the decisive impact Aristotle had on the development of Heidegger’s thinking. At the same time it also is a work of philosophy in its own right that uses Heidegger and Aristotle as the occasion to reflect on the nature of phenomenological method. In this review I will trace some of the major moments in Brogan’s book, focusing on his account of the twofoldness of being and then on the implications of this account for philosophical method. In chapter 1, “Martin Heidegger’s Relationship to Aristotle,” Brogan pre- sents philosophy as the artful practice of renewing shared meaning that becomes uprooted by overfamiliarity. Just as meaning shared in friendships and community must be renewed every so often, so too philosophy must return to the origin in which it is nourished. Brogan holds this view of Aristo- tle’s treatment of his predecessors; it is “not merely a preliminary inves tigation, but a philosophical

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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