Erich Unger's "The Natural Order of Miracles": I. The Pentateuch and the Vitalistic Myth

Erich Unger's "The Natural Order of Miracles": I. The Pentateuch and the Vitalistic Myth The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy , 2002, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 135–152 Erich Unger’s ‘‘The Natural Order of Miracles’’: I. The Pentateuch and the Vitalistic Myth* Translated by Esther J. Ehrman y POB 1170, Reh Bar Ilan 49/5, Bet Shemesh 99 000, Israel Introduction by E.J. Ehrman The first decades of the twentieth century were highly creative, – James Joyce, Henri Bergson, Albert Einstein are but the first to come to mind. The young writer and thinker, Erich Unger, (Born 1887 in Berlin) found the intellectual climate highly congenial. His writings, whether on Nietzsche, on political theory or on Expressionism were admired and well received. In 1909, Unger and a number of friends founded the Expressionist ‘Neue Klub’, intended as a forum for his generation of young intellectuals, poets and artists. Their cultural impact has been documented by Richard Sheppard ( Die Schriften des Neuen Klubs , 1908–14 , Hildesheim, 1980,83). Among the members of the ‘klub’ were two of Unger’s one time schoolfriends, Erwin Lowensohn and Edgar Zacharias. They were also members of a quartet of friends known as ‘the Great World Root’. The fourth, educated like them in the Greek and Latin tradition http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy Brill

Erich Unger's "The Natural Order of Miracles": I. The Pentateuch and the Vitalistic Myth

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1053-699X
eISSN
1477-285X
D.O.I.
10.1163/105369902102822811
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy , 2002, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 135–152 Erich Unger’s ‘‘The Natural Order of Miracles’’: I. The Pentateuch and the Vitalistic Myth* Translated by Esther J. Ehrman y POB 1170, Reh Bar Ilan 49/5, Bet Shemesh 99 000, Israel Introduction by E.J. Ehrman The first decades of the twentieth century were highly creative, – James Joyce, Henri Bergson, Albert Einstein are but the first to come to mind. The young writer and thinker, Erich Unger, (Born 1887 in Berlin) found the intellectual climate highly congenial. His writings, whether on Nietzsche, on political theory or on Expressionism were admired and well received. In 1909, Unger and a number of friends founded the Expressionist ‘Neue Klub’, intended as a forum for his generation of young intellectuals, poets and artists. Their cultural impact has been documented by Richard Sheppard ( Die Schriften des Neuen Klubs , 1908–14 , Hildesheim, 1980,83). Among the members of the ‘klub’ were two of Unger’s one time schoolfriends, Erwin Lowensohn and Edgar Zacharias. They were also members of a quartet of friends known as ‘the Great World Root’. The fourth, educated like them in the Greek and Latin tradition

Journal

The Journal of Jewish Thought and PhilosophyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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