Equivocal Alliances of Phenomenological Psychologists

Equivocal Alliances of Phenomenological Psychologists 1 EQUIVOCAL ALLIANCES OF PHENOMENOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS* P.D. Ashworth It is, I suppose, a necessary characteristic of intellectual debate that each theoretical position is partly defined by the way in which it contrasts with other standpoints. Psychological theories are no exception to this general rule. Members of distinct theoretical schools make the distinguishing features of their work plain by drawing attention to the ways these diverge from the approaches of other schools. Thus Gestalt theorists attack the atomism of behaviorist psychology, personal con- struct theorists reject the models of man of behaviorism and of psychoanalysis, and so on. This method of presenting a theory has been prominent in the apologetics of phenomenological psychologists as well: phenomenological psychology defines itself, in part, by contrast with other approaches. However, another tendency is clearly visible in the expositions of their stance by phenomenological psychologists - a tendency which I would judge to be less usual among exponents of other theoretical ap- proaches to psychology. This is the tendency to claim similarity with the viewpoint of others. Alliances of this sort which have been proposed by phenomenological psychologists include ones with: Gestalt psychology (MacLeod, 1947); humanistic psychology (Keen, 1975 - cf. Giorgi, 1975b, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Phenomenological Psychology Brill

Equivocal Alliances of Phenomenological Psychologists

Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, Volume 12 (2): 1 – Jan 1, 1981

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1981 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0047-2662
eISSN
1569-1624
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916281X00128
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 EQUIVOCAL ALLIANCES OF PHENOMENOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS* P.D. Ashworth It is, I suppose, a necessary characteristic of intellectual debate that each theoretical position is partly defined by the way in which it contrasts with other standpoints. Psychological theories are no exception to this general rule. Members of distinct theoretical schools make the distinguishing features of their work plain by drawing attention to the ways these diverge from the approaches of other schools. Thus Gestalt theorists attack the atomism of behaviorist psychology, personal con- struct theorists reject the models of man of behaviorism and of psychoanalysis, and so on. This method of presenting a theory has been prominent in the apologetics of phenomenological psychologists as well: phenomenological psychology defines itself, in part, by contrast with other approaches. However, another tendency is clearly visible in the expositions of their stance by phenomenological psychologists - a tendency which I would judge to be less usual among exponents of other theoretical ap- proaches to psychology. This is the tendency to claim similarity with the viewpoint of others. Alliances of this sort which have been proposed by phenomenological psychologists include ones with: Gestalt psychology (MacLeod, 1947); humanistic psychology (Keen, 1975 - cf. Giorgi, 1975b,

Journal

Journal of Phenomenological PsychologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1981

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