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Epistemic Pragmatism (A Reply)

Epistemic Pragmatism (A Reply) Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 6, No. 1 (June 2009), 179­181 Editions Rodopi © 2009 Nicholas Rescher A reply to John Lach's article, "Rescher's Cognitive Pragmatism," published in this issue of Contemporary Pragmatism. I have always viewed it as an ironic fact that in philosophy criticism is a mode of collaboration. For it provides its target both with an incentive to clarify his or her position and with an indication of the places where further clarification would strengthen the case. Accordingly, I welcome this present demarche of my acute critic. The main criticism that is here made regarding my position is that its focus on knowledge, inquiry, and communication overintellectualizes the pragmatism that I espouse. As my critic sees it, I overindulge an academic predisposition in favor of knowledge. He views me as an ivory-tower intellectualist indulging a facile optimism in believing that the expansion of knowledge invariably makes for an improvement of life, and so places me among the "cheerleaders of reason" who devalue the noncognitive side of human life. Now I acknowledge that if this charge held good it would put my pragmatic position into a decidedly questionable light. But as I see it, the charge simply fails http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Epistemic Pragmatism (A Reply)

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 6 (1): 179 – Apr 21, 2009

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2009 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 6, No. 1 (June 2009), 179­181 Editions Rodopi © 2009 Nicholas Rescher A reply to John Lach's article, "Rescher's Cognitive Pragmatism," published in this issue of Contemporary Pragmatism. I have always viewed it as an ironic fact that in philosophy criticism is a mode of collaboration. For it provides its target both with an incentive to clarify his or her position and with an indication of the places where further clarification would strengthen the case. Accordingly, I welcome this present demarche of my acute critic. The main criticism that is here made regarding my position is that its focus on knowledge, inquiry, and communication overintellectualizes the pragmatism that I espouse. As my critic sees it, I overindulge an academic predisposition in favor of knowledge. He views me as an ivory-tower intellectualist indulging a facile optimism in believing that the expansion of knowledge invariably makes for an improvement of life, and so places me among the "cheerleaders of reason" who devalue the noncognitive side of human life. Now I acknowledge that if this charge held good it would put my pragmatic position into a decidedly questionable light. But as I see it, the charge simply fails

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2009

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