Epigenetic effects on personality traits: early food provisioning and sibling competition

Epigenetic effects on personality traits: early food provisioning and sibling competition Epigenetic effects on personality traits: early food provisioning and sibling competition Claudio Carere 1,2) , Piet J. Drent 3) , Jaap M. Koolhaas 4) & Ton G.G. Groothuis 1,5) ( 1 Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; 2 Center for Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Behavioural Neuroendocrinology Research Group, University of Liege, Belgium; 3 Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Center for Terrestrial Ecology, Heteren, The Netherlands; 4 Department of Animal Physiology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands) (Accepted: 4 March 2005) Summary The relative contribution of genetic and non-genetic factors in shaping personality traits is of fundamental relevance to biologists and social scientists. Individual animals vary in the way they cope with challenges in their environment, comparable with variation in human personalities. This variation has a substantial genetic basis. Here we describe experiments showing the strength of environmental factors (food availability and sibling competition) in shaping personality traits in a passerine bird ( Parus major ). We manipulated the early rearing condition in two lines (F4) bidirectionally selected for different personalities (fast line: high exploration speed and high aggression; slow line: low exploration speed and low aggression) with a food rationing protocol inducing an impairment in growth rate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Epigenetic effects on personality traits: early food provisioning and sibling competition

Behaviour, Volume 142 (9-10): 1329 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853905774539328
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Epigenetic effects on personality traits: early food provisioning and sibling competition Claudio Carere 1,2) , Piet J. Drent 3) , Jaap M. Koolhaas 4) & Ton G.G. Groothuis 1,5) ( 1 Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; 2 Center for Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Behavioural Neuroendocrinology Research Group, University of Liege, Belgium; 3 Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Center for Terrestrial Ecology, Heteren, The Netherlands; 4 Department of Animal Physiology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands) (Accepted: 4 March 2005) Summary The relative contribution of genetic and non-genetic factors in shaping personality traits is of fundamental relevance to biologists and social scientists. Individual animals vary in the way they cope with challenges in their environment, comparable with variation in human personalities. This variation has a substantial genetic basis. Here we describe experiments showing the strength of environmental factors (food availability and sibling competition) in shaping personality traits in a passerine bird ( Parus major ). We manipulated the early rearing condition in two lines (F4) bidirectionally selected for different personalities (fast line: high exploration speed and high aggression; slow line: low exploration speed and low aggression) with a food rationing protocol inducing an impairment in growth rate

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: PERSONALITY; AGGRESSION; FOOD AVAILABILITY; GREAT TIT; SIBLING COMPETITION; EXPLORATION; ONTOGENY

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