Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy

Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005 Phronesis L/1 Also available online – www.brill.nl Accepted August 2004 1 I am grateful to Robert Todd, Bob Sharples, Richard Sorabji, Peter Adamson, Sylvia Berryman, and Inna Kupreeva for their comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this paper. I am especially grateful to Robert Todd for helping translate some of the more di ffi cult passages. The fi nal section was read to the Greek Philosophy Gang at the University of Western Ontario (fall, 2003) who o ff ered some very helpful comments. Finally, I wish to thank an anonymous referee for their helpful comments and Verity Harte and Christopher Gill for their useful editorial suggestions. Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy 1 DEVIN HENRY A BSTRACT Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own develop- ment required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius, who all looked to con- temporary technology to supply that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Phronesis Brill

Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy

Phronesis, Volume 50 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0031-8868
eISSN
1568-5284
DOI
10.1163/1568528053066951
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005 Phronesis L/1 Also available online – www.brill.nl Accepted August 2004 1 I am grateful to Robert Todd, Bob Sharples, Richard Sorabji, Peter Adamson, Sylvia Berryman, and Inna Kupreeva for their comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this paper. I am especially grateful to Robert Todd for helping translate some of the more di ffi cult passages. The fi nal section was read to the Greek Philosophy Gang at the University of Western Ontario (fall, 2003) who o ff ered some very helpful comments. Finally, I wish to thank an anonymous referee for their helpful comments and Verity Harte and Christopher Gill for their useful editorial suggestions. Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy 1 DEVIN HENRY A BSTRACT Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own develop- ment required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius, who all looked to con- temporary technology to supply that

Journal

PhronesisBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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