Elite Distinction and Regime Change: The Ethiopian Case

Elite Distinction and Regime Change: The Ethiopian Case © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156913311X590664 Comparative Sociology 10 (2011) 636–653 brill.nl/coso C O M P A R A T I V E S O C I O L O G Y Elite Distinction and Regime Change: The Ethiopian Case Alexander Attilio Vadala Doctoral Student in Political Science Centre for Development and the Environment, The University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1116 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway a.a.vadala@sum.uio.no Abstract This article analyzes the symbolic manifestations of power by Ethiopian political elites at the national level. It explains what power symbols they associate them- selves with and what meanings these symbols have. More particularly, it analyzes whether these power symbols have changed over time, and if so what explains the change(s). These questions are answered by comparing the last three Ethiopian regimes. The article relies on secondary sources and on the author’s personal observations. Keywords elite, symbol, regime, Ethiopia, Haile Selassie, Derg, EPRDF Compared to other African states, Ethiopia has a relatively “strong state” tradition. It is one of only two African countries never to have been colo- nized by European powers. 1 Domestically, political elites play an impor- tant role in the power configurations of the modern Ethiopian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Sociology Brill

Elite Distinction and Regime Change: The Ethiopian Case

Comparative Sociology, Volume 10 (4): 636 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-1322
eISSN
1569-1330
D.O.I.
10.1163/156913311X590664
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156913311X590664 Comparative Sociology 10 (2011) 636–653 brill.nl/coso C O M P A R A T I V E S O C I O L O G Y Elite Distinction and Regime Change: The Ethiopian Case Alexander Attilio Vadala Doctoral Student in Political Science Centre for Development and the Environment, The University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1116 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway a.a.vadala@sum.uio.no Abstract This article analyzes the symbolic manifestations of power by Ethiopian political elites at the national level. It explains what power symbols they associate them- selves with and what meanings these symbols have. More particularly, it analyzes whether these power symbols have changed over time, and if so what explains the change(s). These questions are answered by comparing the last three Ethiopian regimes. The article relies on secondary sources and on the author’s personal observations. Keywords elite, symbol, regime, Ethiopia, Haile Selassie, Derg, EPRDF Compared to other African states, Ethiopia has a relatively “strong state” tradition. It is one of only two African countries never to have been colo- nized by European powers. 1 Domestically, political elites play an impor- tant role in the power configurations of the modern Ethiopian

Journal

Comparative SociologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: elite; regime; Haile Selassie; symbol; EPRDF; Ethiopia; Derg

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