Effects of toe-clipping on the survival and behaviour of the Australian frog Crinia signifera

Effects of toe-clipping on the survival and behaviour of the Australian frog Crinia signifera Short Note Effects of toe-clipping on the survival and behaviour of the Australian frog Crinia signifera Francis Lemckert School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia Present Address: Forest Ecology Section, Research Division, State Forests of NSW, PO Box 100 Beecroft, NSW 2119 Australia Although many studies of anurans have used toe-clipping as a method for the identifi- cation of individuals, few have tried to quantify any effects that this kind of marking may have upon the animals. Quantifying the effect of toe-clipping is essential, however, to allow accurate interpretations of population parameters such as mortality rates. The results of the few studies that have looked at the effects of toe-clipping are varied. Staen- dart (1967) found that toe-clipping did not reduce the survival of Rana virgatipes, and concluded that any effect of toe-clipping on the frogs was only slight and temporary. In contrast, Golay and Durrer (1994) marked 96 natterjack toads (Bufo calamita) and found that 12 out of 66 recaptured individuals developed infections of the toe-clipped foot/feet, with the infections becoming quite severe in some frogs. Clarke (1972) found a reduced survivorship with an increase in the number of toes removed in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Effects of toe-clipping on the survival and behaviour of the Australian frog Crinia signifera

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 17 (3): 287 – Jan 1, 1996

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1996 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
DOI
10.1163/156853896X00450
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short Note Effects of toe-clipping on the survival and behaviour of the Australian frog Crinia signifera Francis Lemckert School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia Present Address: Forest Ecology Section, Research Division, State Forests of NSW, PO Box 100 Beecroft, NSW 2119 Australia Although many studies of anurans have used toe-clipping as a method for the identifi- cation of individuals, few have tried to quantify any effects that this kind of marking may have upon the animals. Quantifying the effect of toe-clipping is essential, however, to allow accurate interpretations of population parameters such as mortality rates. The results of the few studies that have looked at the effects of toe-clipping are varied. Staen- dart (1967) found that toe-clipping did not reduce the survival of Rana virgatipes, and concluded that any effect of toe-clipping on the frogs was only slight and temporary. In contrast, Golay and Durrer (1994) marked 96 natterjack toads (Bufo calamita) and found that 12 out of 66 recaptured individuals developed infections of the toe-clipped foot/feet, with the infections becoming quite severe in some frogs. Clarke (1972) found a reduced survivorship with an increase in the number of toes removed in

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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