Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus

Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus Short Notes Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus Samantha C. Larimer 1 , Robert Powell 2,4 , John S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2,3 Abstract. Knowledge of escape behavior contributes to an understanding of a species’ natural history and provides insights into the physical capabilities of that animal in a natural setting. Using an “approach stick” to standardize the “threat” to which an animal responded, we examined reactions of the Anguillian anole , Anolis gingivinus . As in other anoles , A. gingivinus allowed relatively close approaches, followed by the behaviors of squirreling, running, jumping, or combinations thereof. The most important factors determining which action was taken were the diameter of the lizard’s perch and the direction the lizard was facing. Amount of sun exposure also had an effect on behavior, whereas sex of individuals did not. Some visual aspect of the putative predator also had an effect, determining in part the distance at which the animal fled. Antipredator behavior requires animals to weigh the costs of remaining where they are and pos- sibly continuing their current activity against the costs of fleeing (Ydenberg and Dill, 1986; Lima and Dill, 1990). The costs http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853806778877086
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short Notes Effects of structural habitat on the escape behavior of the lizard, Anolis gingivinus Samantha C. Larimer 1 , Robert Powell 2,4 , John S. Parmerlee, Jr. 2,3 Abstract. Knowledge of escape behavior contributes to an understanding of a species’ natural history and provides insights into the physical capabilities of that animal in a natural setting. Using an “approach stick” to standardize the “threat” to which an animal responded, we examined reactions of the Anguillian anole , Anolis gingivinus . As in other anoles , A. gingivinus allowed relatively close approaches, followed by the behaviors of squirreling, running, jumping, or combinations thereof. The most important factors determining which action was taken were the diameter of the lizard’s perch and the direction the lizard was facing. Amount of sun exposure also had an effect on behavior, whereas sex of individuals did not. Some visual aspect of the putative predator also had an effect, determining in part the distance at which the animal fled. Antipredator behavior requires animals to weigh the costs of remaining where they are and pos- sibly continuing their current activity against the costs of fleeing (Ydenberg and Dill, 1986; Lima and Dill, 1990). The costs

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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