Effect of habitat drying on the development of the Eastern spadefoot toad (Pelobates syriacus) tadpoles

Effect of habitat drying on the development of the Eastern spadefoot toad (Pelobates syriacus)... Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (2010): 425-434 Effect of habitat drying on the development of the Eastern spadefoot toad ( Pelobates syriacus ) tadpoles Paul Székely 1 ,* , Marian Tudor 2 , Dan Cog ˘ alniceanu 2 Abstract. Amphibians exhibit plasticity in the timing of metamorphosis, and tadpoles of many species respond to pond drying by accelerating their development. In the present study we investigated the phenotypic plasticity of the developmental response to water volume reduction in tadpoles of Eastern spadefoot toad Pelobates syriacus . The response of tadpoles to the simulated drying conditions was evaluated by gradually reducing the water level in the experimental containers under controlled laboratory conditions. Four water level treatments were used: constant high, slow decrease, fast decrease and constant low level. We tested if (i) tadpoles can speed up their development in a drying aquatic habitat, and (ii) if the accelerated development causes a reduced body size at metamorphosis. Our results showed that P. syriacus tadpoles were able to respond to pond drying by speeding up their metamorphosis and that metamorphosis was not influenced by water level, but by water level decrease rate. The accelerated development caused by the decreasing water level resulted in smaller http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Effect of habitat drying on the development of the Eastern spadefoot toad (Pelobates syriacus) tadpoles

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 31 (3): 425 – Jan 1, 2010

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
DOI
10.1163/156853810791769536
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (2010): 425-434 Effect of habitat drying on the development of the Eastern spadefoot toad ( Pelobates syriacus ) tadpoles Paul Székely 1 ,* , Marian Tudor 2 , Dan Cog ˘ alniceanu 2 Abstract. Amphibians exhibit plasticity in the timing of metamorphosis, and tadpoles of many species respond to pond drying by accelerating their development. In the present study we investigated the phenotypic plasticity of the developmental response to water volume reduction in tadpoles of Eastern spadefoot toad Pelobates syriacus . The response of tadpoles to the simulated drying conditions was evaluated by gradually reducing the water level in the experimental containers under controlled laboratory conditions. Four water level treatments were used: constant high, slow decrease, fast decrease and constant low level. We tested if (i) tadpoles can speed up their development in a drying aquatic habitat, and (ii) if the accelerated development causes a reduced body size at metamorphosis. Our results showed that P. syriacus tadpoles were able to respond to pond drying by speeding up their metamorphosis and that metamorphosis was not influenced by water level, but by water level decrease rate. The accelerated development caused by the decreasing water level resulted in smaller

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

Keywords: LARVAL PERIOD; TEMPORARY PONDS; METAMORPHOSIS; AMPHIBIANS; METAMORPHIC CLIMAX; PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY

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